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Public asked to help find historical remains of WWI

British soldiers negotiate the Winter landscape along the River Somme in late 1916. Credit: PA

Members of the public are being asked to "turn detective" to help identify as-yet unfound historical remains of the First World War.

As part of the Britain from Above project people are being asked to "tag" an online archive of aerial photographs of sites, ruins and remains showing the impact of the Great War on English soil.

The four-year project, run by English Heritage, aims to make a collection of photographs taken by the pioneering Aerofilms company over the course of the 20th century available online.

Helen Grant, minister for the First World War Centenary, said: "The First World War left a huge footprint on the UK's towns, villages, cities and countryside.

"No matter where you live now or where your family were living and working in 1914-18, there are likely to be structures, sites or whole buildings that survive.

"Now the public can help create a lasting aerial photographic record of the impact of the war on our landscape."

People can join the Britain from Above Home Front Legacy Group for free here.

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New £5 coin to feature British WW1 nurse Edith Cavell

A British nurse executed by the Germans during the First World War is to be featured on a new commemorative £5 coin. The Edith Cavell coin will form part of a commemorative set to be issued next year by the Royal Mint marking the centenary of the war.

Nurses and family of World War I nurse Edith Cavell. Credit: PA

Miss Cavell worked as a nurse in German-occupied Belgium where she helped save the lives of soldiers from both sides.She was shot by a German firing squad for helping Allied soldiers to escape across the border into the Netherlands.

Biscuits from First World War to be auctioned

A pair of 100-year-old biscuits, which were issued to soldiers during the First World War, are to go under the hammer at Lockdales auctioneers in Martlesham, Suffolk.

The snacks have been preserved for nearly a century after being brought home by front line survivor Lieutenant Lionel Bruce Charles, who served with the 5th Battalion of the Queen's Regiment in Gallipoli and the Dardanelles in Turkey.

The bidding for the biscuits, which have survived some of the bloodiest battles of WWI, will start at £60. Credit: SWNS

The bidding for the biscuits which have survived some of the bloodiest battles of the First World War will start at a modest £60.

Each of the biscuits have a label on them saying: "Biscuits used by troops in Sulva Bay" - the peninsula captured by British soldiers at Gallipoli in 1915.

"This 100th anniversary year since the start of The Great War makes all memorabilia from the period collectable," auction manager James Sadler said.

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