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PM meets workers who helped to reopen Dawlish line

David Cameron is meeting workers who helped to re-open the railway line in Dawlish, Devon, which was destroyed by storms in February.

The south-west was left cut off to trains following the damage caused by bad weather.

Somerset Levels dredgers retrieve eight cars from river

Environment Agency staff recover a car from the River Parrett Credit: Aaron Baker / SWNS.com

Workers dredging a river in the Somerset Levels have turned up eight cars over the last week, all within 100 metres of each other.

This van was among eight vehicles retrieved from the riverbed Credit: Aaron Baker/SWNS.com

Environment Agency staff working to help relieve flooding in the area noticed the cars, which could be up to 20 years old, in the drainage channel of the River Parrett.

It is so far unknown how the cars may have ended up on the riverbed, but officials stressed they would not have contributed to recent high water levels.

Workers examine another of the cars retrieved from the River Parrett Credit: Aaron Baker / SWNS.com

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First Dawlish train leaves London after storm damage

ITV News reporter Lewis Vaughan-Jones is travelling on the 07.06 train from Paddington to Dawlish. The railway line in Devon had been closed following recent storm damage, leaving travellers unable to reach Devon and Cornwall directly by train.

Flood damaged Dawlish line reopens

After weeks of work by a 300-strong team, Network Rail (NR) has been able to restore the badly-damaged line at Dawlish in Devon.

Then: The Dawlish line on 5th February this year. Credit: PA Wire

The coast-hugging line at Dawlish bore the brunt of the severe weather this winter, with the sea wall breached and the line badly damaged on 4th February.

This led to the line linking Exeter St Davids with Newton Abbot, Plymouth and Penzance to close and saw the start of a huge repair job by NR.Large teams of workers moved in to start the massive clear up.

Now: The Dawlish line on 12th March. Credit: PA Wire

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Dredging begins across flooded Somerset

The UN biggest study into the impact of climate change released today warned severe flooding will be more frequent as the effects of climate change are felt across the globe.

Read: Global experts warn global warming damage 'severe, pervasive and irreversible'

Governments have been urged to prepare for the risks of climate change such as higher sea levels, and adapt to the changing weather patterns it may bring.

In Somerset today residents celebrated as dredging started in the River Parret, as part of the Environment Agency's 'Flood Action Plan'. Measures such as dredging could become more common, as Dan Rivers reports.

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