Live updates

Advertisement

First Dawlish train leaves London after storm damage

ITV News reporter Lewis Vaughan-Jones is travelling on the 07.06 train from Paddington to Dawlish. The railway line in Devon had been closed following recent storm damage, leaving travellers unable to reach Devon and Cornwall directly by train.

Flood damaged Dawlish line reopens

After weeks of work by a 300-strong team, Network Rail (NR) has been able to restore the badly-damaged line at Dawlish in Devon.

Then: The Dawlish line on 5th February this year. Credit: PA Wire

The coast-hugging line at Dawlish bore the brunt of the severe weather this winter, with the sea wall breached and the line badly damaged on 4th February.

This led to the line linking Exeter St Davids with Newton Abbot, Plymouth and Penzance to close and saw the start of a huge repair job by NR.Large teams of workers moved in to start the massive clear up.

Now: The Dawlish line on 12th March. Credit: PA Wire

Advertisement

Dredging begins across flooded Somerset

The UN biggest study into the impact of climate change released today warned severe flooding will be more frequent as the effects of climate change are felt across the globe.

Read: Global experts warn global warming damage 'severe, pervasive and irreversible'

Governments have been urged to prepare for the risks of climate change such as higher sea levels, and adapt to the changing weather patterns it may bring.

In Somerset today residents celebrated as dredging started in the River Parret, as part of the Environment Agency's 'Flood Action Plan'. Measures such as dredging could become more common, as Dan Rivers reports.

Dredging begins in flooded areas of Somerset

Dredging is underway on the the flood-hit Somerset Moors and Levels this morning.

Workers from Land & Water dredging the River Parrett Credit: ITV News West Country

Work is beginning on a 200-yard stretch on the River Parrett, before excavators start on a five-mile stretch of river near Burrowbridge.

The work is on a key part of the river which has been specially identified for dredging and where "significant amounts" of silt have built up, the Environment Agency has said.

The River Parrett has built up 'significant amounts' of silt Credit: ITV News West Country

Local campaigners and residents have blamed the extent of the crisis on a lack of dredging on the River Tone and River Parrett.

Gav Sadler, of Flooding on the Levels Action Group (Flag), said the dredging was "a very encouraging sight, but is just the beginning."

Local campaigners have criticised a lack of dredging of rivers in Somerset Credit: ITV News West Country

"We would like to see all the rivers dredged," he went on. "Another issue is we don't know the quality of the dredging they are going to do.

"We would like to see a little bit of transparency from the Environment Agency," he added. "This affects our lives, we want to make sure they do a proper job."

Land & Water removing silt from the River Parrett today Credit: ITV News West Country

Environment Agency: Dredging an 'important milestone'

The start of dredging the Somerset Levels is "an important milestone" in the Government's attempts to repair the country after December and January's floods.

Dr Paul Leinster, Chief Executive at the Environment Agency, said:

Today is an important milestone in the work to reduce the risk of flooding to people, property and land in Somerset and we welcome the additional money from Government that has allowed us to undertake this further dredging.

– Dr Paul Leinster
Load more updates