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Flu jab to be given to two and three-year-olds

Two and three-year-olds will be vaccinated against flu for the first time. Credit: PA Wire

Children aged two and three will be vaccinated against flu for the first time in a raft of new Government measures to prevent a winter health crisis.

Health Secretary Jeremy Hunt presented the step as part of his strategy to help the most vulnerable during the winter months after announcing an ambitious plan to overhaul the way A&E departments cope with increased pressure.

He told reporters that NHS trusts will have to ensure that 75% of all their staff have been vaccinated against flu to gain access to a new £500 million A&E fund next year.

This winter 53 of the most "at risk" A&E departments across the country will have access to the fund to help them provide extra consultant care, improve care for those with long-term conditions and integrate better with social care teams.

Two-year-olds to be offered flu jab from September

All children aged two to 17 are to be given the flu vaccination through a nasal spray, the Health Department announced today.

Two-year-olds will be offered the flu vaccine via a nasal spray from September
Two-year-olds will be offered the flu vaccine via a nasal spray from September Credit: Niall Carson/PA Wire

The programme was supposed to be rolled out throughout 2014 but experts today said that two-year-olds will be offered the spray from September this year.

The UK will become the first country to offer the flu vaccine to healthy children free of charge.

Healthy children are among those who are least likely to develop complications from being infected by flu, but their close contact with each other means they are more likely to transmit the virus to one another and other vulnerable people.

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Brits to stay home on 'national sickie day'

David Jones/PA Wire
375,000 will take today off sick, according to new research Credit: Lewis Whyld/PA Archive

As many as 375,000 workers are expected to take the day off work today, with half of the country's bosses admitting they do not always believe those who phone in sick.

The post-Christmas blues, poor weather and a long wait for the summer holiday season are just a few of the factors involved as Brits stay at home.

Flu cases continue to increase

Latest figures from the Health Protection Agency inidcate that the number of flu cases is continuing to increase.

Several indicators include GP consultation rates, the proportion of calls to NHS Direct and new admissions to intensive care of high dependency units.

Flu activity continuing to increase.

Children aged five to 14 in particular have been the group most affected by flu so far this season.

Dr Richard Pebody, head of seasonal flu surveillance at the HPA said: “Vaccination against flu is still the most effective way of preventing the virus in people who are in an ‘at risk’ group, as they are more vulnerable to developing complications from flu.

"This includes people with underlying conditions such as heart problems, diabetes, lung, liver or renal diseases and those with weakened immune systems, as well as older people and pregnant women."

North East of England 'most affected by flu'

Researchers say flu levels are still very low but overall the results suggest that the English region most affected by the virus is the North East with 19,200 per 100,000.

Patient being given a flu jab
Patient being given a flu jab Credit: Press Association

Dr Alma Adler, Research Fellow at the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine said: "We now need more people to sign up and let us know how they are feeling so we can study these figures in greater depth and increase our understanding of seasonal flu."

'At risk' groups urged to get jab as flu season starts

We are seeing an increase in flu activity mainly among school children indicating the start of this year's flu season.

Flu vaccination is still the most effective way of preventing flu and it is not too late to get it so we would encourage all those who are in 'at risk' groups to get vaccinated as they are more vulnerable to developing complications from flu.

These include people with underlying conditions such as heart problems, diabetes, lung, liver or renal diseases and those with weakened immune systems, as well as older people and pregnant women.

– Health Protection Agency

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Health warning issued as flu season begins

Flu
Flu symptoms include a sudden onset of fever, coughs as well as sore throats and aching muscles and joints. Credit: David Jones/PA Wire

An increase in the number of children falling ill has signalled the start of the flu season, prompting a doctors' warning to parents to seek out anti-viral drugs.

The rise of flu among school pupils, aged five to 14, leaves several "at risk" groups more vulnerable, the Health Protection Agency said.

Dr Richard Pebody, who monitors seasonal flu for the agency, said: "These include people with underlying conditions such as heart problems, diabetes, lung, liver or renal diseases and those with weakened immune systems, as well as older people and pregnant women."

A separate health survey said reports of flu are highest in North East of England, with 19,200 cases per 100,000.

Fewer at-risk patients get flu jab

Many people who risk becoming seriously ill if they get the flu have not yet been vaccinated against it.

Figures show the number of patients having the flu jab has declined Credit: David Cheskin/PA Wire

The number of pensioners who have received the vaccination has fallen from the same period last year.

And the number of other "at risk" patients, who are under the age of 65 and suffer from various medical complications, has also decreased.

Figures show that by the end of last week, 48.9% of patients aged 65 or older had the flu jab, but in the same week in 2011, 54.8% of pensioners had received it.

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