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  1. Wales

Company: No turkey product has made it into food chain

The Newport company criticised by the Food Standards Agency over turkey butterflies said to have been processed in 'unapproved premises' has told ITV News that none of the turkey product has made it into the food chain, and the issue was simply over storing it in the wrong part of the building.

Severnside Provisions Ltd is based on Leeway Industrial Estate in Newport.

Severnside Provisions Ltd said it has not processed any turkey, it just wholesales the product.

Managing Director Anthony O'Sullivan said: "It was just a licensing issue. The turkey was stored in a part of the building not covered by our licence."

"None of this turkey has made it into the food chain. There was never any danger to the public."

What to do if you are concerned about a product

If you are concerned about a turkey product you have bought, here's the advice from the Food Standards Agency:

  • Only turkey butterflies (boneless breast of turkey) affected
  • Products have been distributed to retailers in South and Mid Wales, South West and South Central England
  • Customers should ask the shop where they bought the product to confirm whether it was processed by Severnside Provisions Ltd
  • If so, product should not be eaten

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FSA: Plant was 'approved for processing bacon'

The Food Standards Agency has said that the plant that processed the turkey butterflies "is approved for processing bacon".

But it said the firm had been "processing turkeys in conditions that do not meet the required hygiene standards for food production".

The Severnside Provisions Ltd premises in Newport, South Wales Credit: Google Maps

ITV News could not immediately reach Severnside Provisions Ltd for comment.

FSA fears four tonnes of product entered food chain

It is suspected that 12 tonnes of turkey butterflies, processed by Severnside Provisions Ltd at premises in Newport, South Wales were supplied to independent butchers and catering outlets throughout South and Mid Wales, South West and south-central England.

Eight tonnes have so far been retained and prevented from entering the food chain after action by Newport City Council.

There is no evidence at present of any specific risk to public health from consuming this product. However, it is illegal to supply meat from unapproved premises.

– spokesman, food standards agency

Customers advised not to eat turkey butterflies

Customers have been advised not to eat a batch of turkey butterflies that were produced in "unapproved premises", the food safety watchdog has warned.

Turkey meat was processed by Severnside Provisions Ltd in Newport, South Wales "in conditions that do not meet the required hygiene standards for food production", the Food Standards Agency (FSA) said.

An FSA spokesman said there was no "specific risk to public health from consuming this product" but customers who bought a turkey butterfly processed by the firm are advised not to eat it.

FSA: Tesco ice cream cones recall is 'precautionary'

The Food Standards Agency (FSA) tonight said Tesco had issued a recall notice on all Tesco 4 x 110ml packs of chocolate and nut ice cream cones following the two incidents.

Tesco has undertaken a precautionary recall of this product as two individual Tesco chocolate and nut ice cream cones have been found to contain a tablet (for pain relief).

It said the supermarket had recalled all date codes of the product and would be displaying recall notices in stores.

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How to identify the canned sliced beef

A batch of canned sliced beef has been withdrawn from sale in the UK after it was found to contain horse DNA.

The product affected, which is sold in Home Bargains and Quality Save storeshas:

  • A ‘best before’ date of January 2016
  • The 320g packs are described on the label as ‘Food Hall Sliced Beef in Rich Gravy’
  • The batch code of the product is 13.04.C.

Customers are advised to return the product to where it was originally purchased.

  1. Wales

Farmers' union slams poster showing lamb chop in urinal

The poster is part of campaign to get people to look for outlets' food hygiene ratings. Credit: Food Standards Agency

Welsh farmers have criticised a campaign by the Food Standards Agency which shows a lamb chop placed in the bottom of a urinal.

"We are appalled that lamb has been singled out to portray such a negative and extreme message", Farmers' Union of Wales president Emyr Jones said.

The union has demanded that the FSA removes the images from all public places immediately.

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