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Children 'should be exposed to vegetables 5 to 10 times'

Parents who wish to encourage healthy eating in their children should start early and often, researchers from the University of Leeds have said. Lead researcher Professor Marion Hetherington, from the Institute of Psychological Sciences added:

If you want to encourage your children to eat vegetables, make sure you start early and often. Even if your child is fussy or does not like veggies, our study shows that five to 10 exposures will do the trick.

– Professor Marion Hetherington

Children 'need early taste of vegetables', study shows

Offering infants a frequent taste of vegetables may be a way to turn them on to healthy food, a study suggests.

Scientists found that starting early was the key to encouraging children to eat up their greens - or, in this case, artichoke.

Scientists found that starting early was the key to encouraging children to eat up their greens Credit: PA

The vegetable was chosen for the experiment because a survey showed it to be one of the least popular with parents.

Most babies given frequent small meals of artichoke puree increased the amount they ate over time, while 21% fell into the category of "plate clearers" who gobbled up more than 75% of each helping.


Supermarket bosses admit to ignoring sell-by dates

The heads of some of Britain's biggest supermarkets have admitted they regularly ignore sell-by and best-before dates on food they buy for their own families.

Supermarket bosses said they regularly ignored the sell-by date on food products. Credit: Jeff Moore/Jeff Moore/Empics Entertainment

Speaking to the Times magazine, the boss of Morrisons, Dalton Phillips, said he preferred to smell food to see whether it was still OK to eat.

The managing director of Waitrose, Mark Price, said he regularly ate food such as bacon, eggs and vegetables "a day or two after" the use-by date.

The head of the Co-Op's food business, Steve Murrells said: “If you’ve got food in the fridge, and it’s one day past its sell-by date, it’s fine.”

Faulty genes 'cause night munchies'

Night-time snacking is the result of your genes, according to new scientific research.

Scientists from the Salk Institute in California have found that 'night munchies' are linked to a faulty PER1 gene, which controls the body's sleeping and eating patterns.

Late night snacking has become a ritual for many people, but its cause may lie in science Credit: Nathan Denette/The Canadian Press/Press Association Images

If a person's sleeping and eating habits become desynchronised, this can lead to night-time hunger pangs which disrupt sleep and may lead to over-eating and weight gain.

Sainsbury's recalls olives after glass found in jars

Sainsbury's has recalled some of its own-brand olives after discovering glass in "a small number of jars".

Sainsbury's has issued a product recall as a 'precautionary measure'. Credit: Rui Vieira/PA Wire/Press Association Images

The supermarket said they had issued a small-scale product recall as a "precautionary measure" after receiving complaints from customers.

A spokeswoman said anyone with jar with a best before date of 13/1/17 should return the product and would get a full refund.

Five-a-day 'not healthy enough'

File photo dated of a bowl of fruit on a table. Credit: Chris Young/PA Wire

Five helpings of fruit and vegetables a day may not be enough, new research suggests.

Seven portions every day could have a more protective effect, experts said.

The NHS recommends that every person has five different 80g portions of fruit and vegetables a day. The suggested intake, based on World Health Organisation guidance, can lower the risk of serious health problems such as heart disease, stroke, type 2 diabetes and obesity, according to NHS Choices.

But a new study suggests that eating seven or more helpings of fruit and veg a day can reduce a person's risk of dying of cancer by 25%.

Eating this many portions can also reduce a person's risk of dying of heart disease by 31%, the authors said.


Children eating too much salt, study shows

Children aged five and six are eating 0.75 grams more salt than the recommended daily amount and teens are exceeding the limit by around 1.5 grams, researchers claim.

The recommended daily levels of salt according to age are as follows:

  • One to two years - 2g salt per day (0.8g sodium)
  • Four to six years - 3g salt per day (1.2g sodium)
  • Seven to 10 years - 5g salt per day (2g sodium)
  • 11 years and over - 6g salt per day (2.4g sodium)

The study showed that 36% of children's intake of salt comes from a combination of bread-based and cereal products, while meat provided an additional 19%.

An example of salt levels in popular foods (taken from a sample of popular brands):

  • Children's cereal: around 0.3g salt per 30g
  • A slice of white bread: around 0.35g salt per slice
  • Pork sausages: around 0.3g per sausage
  • Ready salted crisps: around 0.45g per packet

Warning over children's salt consumption

More than a third of children's salt consumption is from breads and cereals, researchers have found.

A bacon sandwich Credit: PA Wire

Analysis of young people's diets found that they eat an "unhealthy amount of salt on a daily basis". 36% of this salt comes from cereal and bread-based products, according to the new research.

The study, published in the American Heart Association journal Hypertension, found that many children are exceeding the recommended intake of salt on a daily basis.

Farmed salmon 'should be sterilised'

File photo of of salmon fillets. Credit: PA Wire

Farmed salmon should be sterilised to prevent them breeding with wild fish and introducing genetic weaknesses, experts have urged.

Millions of salmon escape from fish farms each year, and can get into wild spawning populations where they can reproduce and introduce negative genetic traits.

"Farmed salmon grow very fast, are aggressive, and not as clever as wild salmon when it comes to dealing with predators.

"These domestic traits are good for producing fish for the table, but not for the stability of wild populations". Lead researcher Professor Matt Gage said.

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