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Private school pupils score higher marks in GCSEs

Private school pupils score higher marks in GCSEs Credit: Chris Radburn/PA Wire

Private school pupils scored four times as many top grades in their GCSEs and IGCSEs this summer as teenagers across the country, figures show.

Almost a third (32%) of all entries from students at fee-paying schools achieved an A* grade, according to data published by the Independent Schools Council (ISC).

This has risen by one percentage point on last year.

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Your GCSE pictures

Stephanie and Martin watch as Roy phones home to reveal his GCSE grades Credit: Beauchamp College, Oadby
Betty Yang reacts to 11 A* grades Credit: Beauchamp College, Oadby
Celebrations in Derby over GCSE results Credit: Derby High School
A* student: Alice Carlin and mum Sarah open her GCSE results to find she got top marks throughout Credit: Derby High School
Class of 2013 at Loughborough Grammar School Credit: Loughborough Grammar School

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GCSE maths like playing a game, says A* boy, nine

Abhinav Santhiramohan, from Luton, was awarded an A* in GCSE maths Credit: PA

A nine-year-old boy who passed his GCSE maths exam with the top grade today compared the test to a puzzle-solving computer game.

Abhinav Santhiramohan, from Luton, was awarded an A* after taking his GCSE exam seven years early. He even completed the paper with 45 minutes to spare.

Abhinav, who attends Meads Primary School in Luton, now hopes to take his A-level maths exam when he turns 11.

"I felt nervous and confident at the same time," he said. "When I found out it was an A*, it was really surprising."

Institute of Directors: 'Several factors' in GCSE drop

The head of education and skills policy at the Institute of Directors said "several factors" led to a drop in GCSE grades this year, meaning "we should look beyond simple year-on-year comparisons".

The fall in the proportion of students getting top grades at GCSE will dominate the headlines, but we need to keep focused on the bigger picture.

Students who have worked very hard but missed out on the grades they wanted will be disappointed.

But several factors, including the rise in early entry, pupils taking IGCSEs and the increased difficulty of science papers, mean that we should look beyond simple year-on-year comparisons of pass rates.

– Mike Harris, head of education and skills policy at the Institute of Directors

Teachers 'proud' of students after GCSE results

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