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Bin lorry driver refuses to answer questions at inquiry

The driver of the bin lorry that crashed and killed six people in Glasgow last December refused to answer a number of questions as he began to give evidence to a fatal accident inquiry into the incident.

Harry Clarke, 58, was told by Sheriff John Beckett QC that he did not have to answer any questions that might incriminate him.

Some family members left the court after he refused to answer questions put to him by Solicitor General Lesley Thomson QC.

Family members of victims leave court as Harry Clarke gives evidence. Credit: Priscilla Coleman/ITV News

Mr Clarke said he knew the families "would want answers" but dismissed claims he was "putting himself first" by not answering the questions.

The prospect of a private prosecution of Mr Clarke remains - a situation which entitles him not to answer certain questions put to him, if he so chooses.

Bin lorry crash driver due to give evidence tomorrow

The driver of the bin lorry that crashed and killed six people in Glasgow last December will give evidence at the fatal accident inquiry tomorrow.

Sheriff John Beckett adjourned the inquiry until 11am tomorrow when Harry Clarke, 58, is due to give evidence.

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Family could charge lorry driver with dangerous driving

The family of a victim of the Glasgow bin lorry crash are considering prosecuting the driver with a charge of death by dangerous driving.

Dorothy Bain QC, acting for the family of Jacqueline Morton, said that it was clear that driver Harry Clarke was unconscious at the time of the crash last December but that it was "not a complete defence".

She said that Mr Clarke "persisted to lie" about his medical history to his employers which could build a compelling circumstantial case against him.

Victim's family withdraw bid to adjourn bin lorry inquiry

The family of Jacqueline Morton, one of the six victims of the Glasgow bin lorry crash, have withdrawn their application to adjourn the fatal accident inquiry.

Dorothy Bain QC, representing the Morton family, said they felt it was in everyone's interest for the inquiry to continue.

But she said they will still pursue the private prosecution of driver Harry Clarke, 58.

Sheriff John Beckett QC, who is overseeing the inquiry, has asked the Morton family what offence is under consideration for private prosecution.

The inquiry has been given a short adjournment so Ms Bain can set out the alleged criminal conduct.

Private prosecution a 'rare and exceptional beast'

Harry Clarke was driving a refuse truck when he slumped at the wheel in Glasgow city centre. Credit: PA

Solicitor General Lesley Thomson QC, who is leading the fatal accident inquiry into the Glasgow bin lorry crash, has said a private prosecution is a "rare and exceptional beast".

His comments came as the family of a woman who died in the crash told the inquiry they would like an adjournment as they intend to seek the action against the driver.

Six people died when the truck Harry Clarke was driving veered out of control in the city centre last December.

Sheriff John Beckett QC said he would consider the motion for adjournment and the inquiry would hear the evidence of remaining witnesses in the meantime with the exception of Mr Clarke.

His lawyer said "he wants to answer all the questions that are put to him at the inquiry" but added that his client had the right to "privilege against self-incrimination".

Glasgow lorry crash: Mixed reaction to private prosecution bid

(From top-left) Jack and Lorraine Sweeney, Erin McQuade, Stephenie Tait, Gillian Ewing and Jacqueline Morton. Credit: Family handouts

A bid to bring a private prosecution against a bin lorry driver, who crashed and killed six people in Glasgow, is not unanimously supported by the victims' families.

The family of Jacqueline Morton, 51, are seeking authority to launch a court action which is also supported by the family of 52-year-old Gillian Ewing.

However, Ronald Conway, acting for relatives of Stephanie Tait, 29, said they will not be involved in any private prosecution.

He said: "Telling lies is not a crime; telling lies to the medical profession is not a crime."

Meanwhile, Mark Stewart QC, acting for the family of Erin McQuade, 18, and her grandparents Jack Sweeney, 68, and Lorraine Sweeney, 69 said the family wished to reserve the right to prosecute anyone "carrying personal responsibility" for the tragedy.

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Bin lorry inquiry to continue as High Court motion made

An inquiry into the deaths of six people killed in a Glasgow bin lorry crash can continue while the family of one of the victims makes an application for a private prosecution, it has been ruled.

Harry Clarke, who slumped at the wheel of the vehicle before it mounted the pavement in the city centre last December, has been told he will not face public prosecution.

The inquiry is being led by Scotland's second most senior law officer, Solicitor General Lesley Thomson QC and is taking place before Sheriff John Beckett QC.

After discussing the issue, they agreed the inquiry could continue but would not hear evidence from Mr Clarke until the result of the High Court motion.

Glasgow bin lorry crash: Family bid for private prosecution

An inquiry into a bin lorry crash, which killed six people in Glasgow, has heard the family of one of the victim's intends to seek a private prosecution against the driver.

Harry Clarke, aged 58, slumped at the wheel of the vehicle as he drove through the city centre last year December, causing it to veer out of control.

Harry Clarke has been told he will not face a criminal prosecution over the crash. Credit: PA

The fatal accident inquiry has heard that Mr Clarke had a history of dizzy spells and fainting which he failed to disclose to the DVLA and on job application forms.

ITV News' Scotland Correspondent Debi Edward is at the inquiry:

Glasgow bin lorry driver could still face charges in England

The driver of a bin lorry that crashed in Glasgow killing six people could still face charges in England despite learning he will not be prosecuted in Scotland.

The Crown Prosecution Service, acting on behalf of the English-based DVLA, said in February it would not be pursuing any criminal charges in relation to Harry Clarke and last December's fatal incident in George Square.

Harry Clarke fainted before while working as a bus driver but failed to tell Glasgow City Council before the crash in December last year. Credit: Andrew Milligan/PA Wire

But Glasgow Sheriff Court heard officials were considering whether to take action after evidence at an inquiry into the crash showed Mr Clarke had failed to disclose his full medical history.

Lawyers acting on behalf of the victims' families have also been asked to indicate if they intend to pursue a private prosecution against him.

Glasgow bin lorry driver 'will not face criminal charges'

The driver of a bin lorry which crashed and killed six people in Glasgow will not face criminal charges, an inquiry has been told.

Harry Clarke, aged 58, slumped at the wheel of the truck as he drove through the city centre on December 22 last year, causing it to veer out of control.

Harry Clarke was driving the bin lorry when it crashed

It later emerged he had failed to tell Glasgow City Council that he had previously fainted while working as a bus driver in 2010.

Sheriff John Beckett, who is leading the fatal accident inquiry, had asked Solicitor General Lesley Thomson QC whether Mr Clarke could face prosecution for fraud.

She told the court that the Crown Prosecution Service had decided not to prosecute Mr Clarke over the crash, including issues over information provided to doctors, the DVLA and the council.

The hearing heard last week that Mr Clarke has been suspended from work pending an internal investigation, which will take place at the end for the formal inquiry.

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