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£1 million upgrade for Bristol Zoo's gorilla family

Visitors to Bristol Zoo Gardens can now get up close and personal with a family of gorillas as their new £1 million enclosure opens this weekend.

Jock, one of Bristol Zoo's gorillas, lies on the glass roof of the new viewing area in the extended Gorilla House.
Jock, one of Bristol Zoo Garden's gorillas, lies on the glass roof of the new viewing area in the extended Gorilla House. Credit: Tim Ireland/PA Wire
Visitors to Bristol Zoo can get up close and personal with Jock and the other gorillas.
Visitors to Bristol Zoo can get up close and personal with Jock and the other gorillas. Credit: Tim Ireland/PA Wire
The new viewing area in the extended Gorilla House, which opens to the public this Saturday.
The new viewing area in the extended Gorilla House, which opens to the public this Saturday. Credit: Tim Ireland/PA Wire

For more on this story, visit ITV News WestCountry's website

Footage released of toddler playing with gorillas

Footage recorded nineteen years ago of an 18-month-old interacting with a gorilla at Howletts Wild Animal Park in Kent has been released.

Tansy gorilla
Tansy under the watchful eye of the gorilla. Credit: Aspinall Foundation

Damian Aspinall introduced his daughter Tansy to a group of critically endangered gorillas, with the video showing her happily playing with the primates.

The video has been released to help raise awareness of the gorillas' plight and the need to return them to their natural habitat.

To watch the video and for more on this story go to ITV Meridian.

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How humans and gorillas have more in common than we realised

Gorillas are closer to humans than chimpanzees in terms of genes related to hearing Credit: Gareth Fuller/PA

Scientists have discovered that gorillas are closer to humans than chimpanzees in terms of genes related to sensory perception, hearing and brain development.

The findings emerge from the first completed genetic blueprint of gorillas.

Dr Chris Tyler-Smith, senior author of the research published in the journal Nature, said: "Scientists had suggested that the rapid evolution of human hearing genes was linked to the evolution of language.

"Our results cast doubt on this, as hearing genes have evolved in gorillas at a similar rate to those in humans."

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