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Footage released of Salford prison van attack

Police have released dramatic footage of an armed attack on a prison van that freed two prisoners.

A masked gang wielding an axe, a sledgehammer and a shotgun stopped the van on Regent Road on April 30 last year.

They smashed a window, hit the driver, and forced him to release Ryan McDonald and Stephen McMullen.

Today 12 people were convicted of a several of charges ranging from assisting an offender, to conspiracy to escape, to firearms offences in connection with the incident.

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CPS: Breakout gang thought they were 'above the law'

Ryan McDonald was the driving force behind the conspiracy to escape.

He orchestrated the plan alongside Stevie McMullen using mobile phones from their prison cells.

All the defendants in this case thought that they were above the law, but have now been brought to justice for their actions.

Two dangerous men have also been taken back off our streets where they will no longer remain a threat to the public.

– Joanne Cunliffe, Crown Prosecution Service
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Twelve convicted over Salford prison van breakout

The scene of the breakout at Regent Road last April Credit: PA

Twelve people have been convicted over an armed attack on a prison van in Salford that freed two prisoners.

A gang forced the van to stop on the city's Regent Road on 30 April last year. Three masked men smashed the window, hit the driver, and forced him to release Ryan McDonald and Stephen McMullen.

A total of 12 men and women were convicted of a mix of charges ranging from assisting an offender, to conspiracy to escape, to firearms offences.

GMP probed over disposal of Shipman victims' tissue

The Independent Police Complaints Commission has started three investigations into Greater Manchester Police after allegations that "officers misled families and the public when human tissue from victims of serial killer Harold Shipman was disposed of."

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We’ve started 3 investigations into @gmpolice after allegations made by whistleblower serving in the force http://t.co/XcsJJvCiaA

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Allegations against @gmpolice came from serving officer whistleblower. Officers being investigated up to Asst Chief Const level.

For more on this story visit the ITV News Granada website

Police chief: Brits returning from Syria of 'huge concern'

The chief constable of Greater Manchester Police has said there is "huge concern" that Britons returning from Syria could pose a threat when they are back in the UK.

Speaking on BBC Radio 4's Today programme, Sir Peter Fahy said those stopped at the border would be put into "programmes" run by police and local agencies to "try and make sure they're not a threat to this country".

He said that returning UK nationals "may well be charged and investigated" as well.

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Police: Britons returning from Syria 'could be arrested'

Chief Constable Sir Peter Fahy of Greater Manchester Police has told BBC Radio 4's Today programme that British people returning from Syria are being stopped at the border and in some cases arrested.

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'We are stopping people from going out' to fight in #Syria & arresting those coming back says Ch Const Sir Peter Fahy of @gmpolice #r4today

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Exclusive: 'I still want justice for Anthony'

by Matt O'Donaghue

Greater Manchester chief constable Sir Peter Fahy will be charged over the death of unarmed Salford father Anthony Grainger.

It's 2 years since he was shot in the chest by a Greater Manchester police officer.

Anthony Grainger's partner, Gail, talks exclusively to Matt O'Donoghue:

GMP 'seeking resolution for force and the family'

Greater Manchester Police Deputy Chief Constable Ian Hopkins said:

Greater Manchester Police notes the decision of the Crown Prosecution Service to take no further action against any officer following the death of Anthony Grainger in March 2012.

The force also notes the decision of the Crown Prosecution Service to prosecute Greater Manchester Police for a breach of section 3 (1) of the Health and Safety at Work Act 1974.

Since Mr Grainger's death 22 months ago, Greater Manchester Police has co-operated fully with the Independent Police Complaints Commission, the Crown Prosecution Service and HM Coroner. Our sympathies remain with Mr Grainger's family and we deeply regret the loss that they have suffered.

Mr Grainger's family, and the officers involved, have had to wait a long time for this decision to be reached and we share the frustrations over those delays. However, we understand that it was vitally important that the investigation was carried out thoroughly to establish all the facts.

Now that a charging decision has been made regarding the force itself, it is equally important that these legal processes are allowed to take their course unimpeded in order to seek a resolution for both the family of Mr Grainger and the force.

The Independent Police Complaints Commission investigated this matter independently and we await the official publication of their report. This matter also remains the subject of a coronial inquest, so Greater Manchester Police is unable to make further comment at this time.

Police chief need not appear in court personally

Greater Manchester Police Chief Constable Sir Peter Fahy is accused of failing to discharge a duty under the Health and Safety at Work Act as he is "corporation sole" for the force, the Crown Prosecution Service said.

This is a legal status and means that he does not share criminal liability or will personally have to appear in court.

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