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Manchester police chief constable in misconduct probe

The Chief constable of Greater Manchester Police Sir Peter Fahy is facing a misconduct probe over claims he poorly handled an investigation into an alleged child sex offender.

The police force is accused of allowing a teenage boy to enter the flat of a suspected paedophile.

A whistleblower claims three other officers, including one who is now retired, were also at fault. The Independent Police Complaints Commission (IPCC) are now investigating.

ITV News Correspondent Juliet Bremner has this report:

Police chief 'should be suspended' during investigation

Greater Manchester Police chief constable Sir Peter Fahy should be suspended pending the outcome of the IPCC investigation into alleged misconduct, according to Rochdale MP Simon Danczuk.

Greater Manchester Police chief constable Sir Peter Fahy. Credit: Press Association

He told ITV News: "He should be suspended as these are serious allegations. This is not a disciplinary issue we're talking about here, but a potential criminal investigation."

The Labour politician added that he was in no doubt that if another frontline officer faced such serious allegations they would be suspended.

Sir Peter Fahy has been served with a criminal and gross misconduct notice in relation to his "alleged support to an allegedly poorly-handled investigation into a suspected sex offender", the Independent Police Complaints Commission (IPCC) has said.

Danczuk said: "The leadership of Greater Manchester Police risks damaging public trust in the force. Sir Peter says he has done nothing wrong and is confident his name will be cleared. But he should be suspended while that process takes place."

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Police chief faces criminal & gross misconduct notice

Greater Manchester Police chief constable Sir Peter Fahy has been served with a criminal and gross misconduct notice in relation to his "alleged support to an allegedly poorly-handled investigation into a suspected sex offender", the Independent Police Complaints Commission (IPCC) has said.

Greater Manchester Police chief constable Sir Peter Fahy. Credit: Press Association

Another serving officer has been handed a gross misconduct notice following the investigations - prompted by allegations made by a whistleblower - for his oversight in the disposal of body parts belonging to victims of serial killer Harold Shipman.

The IPCC inquiry was broken down into three investigations - claims concerning Shipman's victims, allegations against a detective chief inspector, and claims concerning a sexual abuse investigation.

Sir Peter, a detective superintendent and a detective chief inspector, all serving, have been handed criminal and gross misconduct notices in relation to the investigation into the suspected sex offender. A retired officer will also be served with a criminal and gross misconduct notice over his role in this investigation.

Report: Police discrimination complaint handling 'poor'

Three police forces have been criticised by the police watchdog for "poor" handling of discrimination complaints.

The West Midlands, Greater Manchester and West Yorkshire forces were accused of "significant" failings in the way they dealt with allegations of discrimination, in an Independent Police Complaints Commission (IPCC) report.

Footage released of Salford prison van attack

Police have released dramatic footage of an armed attack on a prison van that freed two prisoners.

A masked gang wielding an axe, a sledgehammer and a shotgun stopped the van on Regent Road on April 30 last year.

They smashed a window, hit the driver, and forced him to release Ryan McDonald and Stephen McMullen.

Today 12 people were convicted of a several of charges ranging from assisting an offender, to conspiracy to escape, to firearms offences in connection with the incident.

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CPS: Breakout gang thought they were 'above the law'

Ryan McDonald was the driving force behind the conspiracy to escape.

He orchestrated the plan alongside Stevie McMullen using mobile phones from their prison cells.

All the defendants in this case thought that they were above the law, but have now been brought to justice for their actions.

Two dangerous men have also been taken back off our streets where they will no longer remain a threat to the public.

– Joanne Cunliffe, Crown Prosecution Service
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Twelve convicted over Salford prison van breakout

The scene of the breakout at Regent Road last April Credit: PA

Twelve people have been convicted over an armed attack on a prison van in Salford that freed two prisoners.

A gang forced the van to stop on the city's Regent Road on 30 April last year. Three masked men smashed the window, hit the driver, and forced him to release Ryan McDonald and Stephen McMullen.

A total of 12 men and women were convicted of a mix of charges ranging from assisting an offender, to conspiracy to escape, to firearms offences.

GMP probed over disposal of Shipman victims' tissue

The Independent Police Complaints Commission has started three investigations into Greater Manchester Police after allegations that "officers misled families and the public when human tissue from victims of serial killer Harold Shipman was disposed of."

Police chief: Brits returning from Syria of 'huge concern'

The chief constable of Greater Manchester Police has said there is "huge concern" that Britons returning from Syria could pose a threat when they are back in the UK.

Speaking on BBC Radio 4's Today programme, Sir Peter Fahy said those stopped at the border would be put into "programmes" run by police and local agencies to "try and make sure they're not a threat to this country".

He said that returning UK nationals "may well be charged and investigated" as well.

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