Bogus health and safety bans exposed

More than 150 bogus safety bans have been exposed as mere ploys by organisations to hide bad customer service or avoid being sued.

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Union: This is a 'cut in throat of safety regulations'

This all-out attack on safety will have lethal consequences for workers and the public alike as businesses are given the green light to cut corners.

Vince Cable's set of plans will drag the clock back and goes hand in hand with massive cuts to the enforcement arm of the health and safety executive.

This isn't about cutting red tape, it's about cutting the throat of safety regulations and the trade unions will mobilise a massive campaign of resistance.

– Bob Crow, leader of the Rail Maritime and Transport union

Businesses: 'Excessive regulation costs time and money'

The Government's efforts on deregulation are welcome.

Today's announcements are good news if they are the beginning, not the end, of the deregulation story.

Excessive regulation costs time and money, both of which businesses would rather spend on developing new products, hiring staff and building up British business both here and abroad.

– Alexander Ehmann, head of regulatory policy at the Institute of Directors

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Ministers vow to put common sense back into health and safety

In these tough times, businesses need to focus all their energies on creating jobs and growth, not being tied up in unnecessary red tape.

I've listened to those concerns and we're determined to put common sense back into areas like health and safety, which will reduce costs and fear of burdensome inspections.

– Business Secretary Vince Cable

Today's announcement injects fresh impetus into our drive to cut red tape. We have identified the red tape and now we are going to cut it.

We're getting out of the way by bringing common sense back to health and safety. We will now be holding departments' feet to the fire to ensure all unnecessary red tape is cut.

– Business Minister Michael Fallon

War on red tape sees 3,000 rules scrapped

More than 3,000 regulations will be scrapped or overhauled, so that shops, offices, pubs and clubs will no longer face "burdensome" health and safety inspections.

Businesses will no longer face 'taxing' health and safety inspections Credit: Anthony Devlin/PA Wire

From next April, the Government intends to introduce binding new rules on both the Health & Safety Executive and local authorities that will exempt hundreds of thousands of businesses from regular inspections.

Firms will only face health and safety inspections if they are operating in higher-risk areas such as construction or if they have an incident or track record of poor performance.

The Government also said it will introduce legislation next month to ensure that businesses will only be held liable for civil damages in health and safety cases if they can be shown to have acted negligently.

Vince Cable to cut back on red tape

Hundreds of thousands of businesses are to be exempted from health and safety inspections under moves announced by Business Secretary Vince Cable today.

Business Secretary Vince Cable
Business Secretary Vince Cable Credit: Tim Ireland/PA Wire

Legislation will be introduced which ministers say will protect business from "compensation culture" claims.

Officials described it as a "radical" plan to curb red tape.

Health and safety 'misuse' to be challenged

Health and safety "misuse", such as children banned from playing conkers unless they wore goggles, or office workers banned from wearing flip flops, will be challenged by a new panel, the Government announced.

The panel, chaired by the head of the Health and Safety Executive (HSE), Judith Hackitt will offer advice to anyone affected by "ridiculous" decisions.

Employment Minister Chris Grayling said: "All too often jobs worths are the real reason for daft health and safety decisions. We want people who are told they cannot put up bunting or they cannot play conkers to know that there is no basis in law for such rulings.

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