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Clinton leaves hospital with husband and daughter

US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton leaves New York Presbyterian Hospital with husband, Bill, and daughter, Chelsea, in New York Credit: Reuters

US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton was discharged from a New York hospital yesterday after being treated for a blood clot near her brain.

Her doctors expect her to make a full recovery, the State Department said.

Hillary Clinton 'eager to get back to the office'

Secretary Clinton was discharged from the hospital this evening.

Her medical team advised her that she is making good progress on all fronts, and they are confident she will make a full recovery.

She's eager to get back to the office, and we will keep you updated on her schedule as it becomes clearer in the coming days.

Both she and her family would like to express their appreciation for the excellent care she received from the doctors, nurses and staff at New York Presbyterian Hospital Columbia University Medical Center.

– PHILIPPE REINES, DEPUTY ASSISTANT SECRETARY OF STATE

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Doctors confident Clinton will make 'full recovery'

Doctors are confident US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton will make a "full recovery" after it was discovered that she had a blood clot.

Clinton was in "good spirits" in hospital, the doctors said in a statement.

Clinton suffered a blood clot between her brain and skill but did not suffer a stroke or neurological damage, the statement added.

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Clinton suffered earlier 'scary' blood clot in leg

Hillary Clinton with her husband Bill and daughter Chelsea in 1998, the year of her earlier blood clot.
Hillary Clinton with her husband Bill and daughter Chelsea in 1998, the year of her earlier blood clot. Credit: APTN/ITV News

Secretary of State Hillary Clinton has previously talked about her health fears, after suffering from a blood clot behind her right knee in 1998.

She told The New York Daily News doctors found a clot in her leg whilst she was working on her Democratic party colleague Chuck Schumer's campaign bid for New York Senate. She said the scare was the most "significant" she had experienced:

"That was scary because you have to treat it immediately - you don't want to take the risk that it will break loose and travel to your brain, or your heart or your lungs. That was the most significant health scare I've ever had."

Clinton 'had been due back at work' after recent illness

US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton in Dublin on December 6 this month.
US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton in Dublin on December 6 this month. Credit: Reuters

US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton had been due to return to work today after being ill for three weeks with a stomach virus and related concussion, according to Foreign Policy, a US current affairs magazine.

Clinton's illness was first disclosed on December 9, a few days after she left Northern Ireland, and was cited as the reason she did not appear to testify in a hearing into the September 11 attack on Benghazi on December 20. After her appearance at the hearing was cancelled, her doctors said:

"Secretary Clinton developed a stomach virus, leading to extreme dehydration, and subsequently fainted. Over the course of this week we evaluated her and ultimately determined she had also sustained a concussion."

The blood clot she is being treated for in hospital is a result of the earlier concussion.

Hillary Clinton 'being assessed by doctors'

US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton has been sent to hospital with a blood clot stemming from a concussion she suffered earlier in the month, a State Department spokesman said. She will be assessed for the next 48 hours, according to spokesman Philippe Reines.

In the course of a follow-up exam today, Secretary Clinton's doctors discovered a blood clot had formed, stemming from the concussion she sustained several weeks ago.

She is being treated with anti-coagulants and is at New York-Presbyterian Hospital so that they can monitor the medication over the next 48 hours.

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