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Vaz urges Home Office to reconsider 'cruel' deportation

Chair of the Home Affairs Select Committee Keith Vaz has written to Home Secretary Theresa May asking her to urgently reconsider the decision to deport Yashika Bageerathi.

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Chair of Home Aff cttee @keithvazmp writes to Home Sec asks her to urgently reconsider decision to deport Yashika Bageerathi. Calls it cruel

Listen: A-level student Yashika Bageerathi makes emotional plea to Home Office to stay in the UK

NHS needs to monitor addict's 'doctor shopping'

GPs need to be made aware of 'Doctor shopping'
GPs need to be made aware of 'Doctor shopping' Credit: Andrew Matthews/PA Wire

Under the previous health service structure, primary care trusts would alert all practices in the local area if there was an individual visiting multiple practices to request specific drugs.

MPs have said that the highlighting of so-called 'doctor shopping' now needs to be "formalised" in order for it to continue with the structural changes in healthcare in UK.

A report recommended that NHS England should issue guidance to local clinical commissioning groups (CCGs), so they take on the gathering of data on patients visiting multiple practices to request specific drugs.

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1.5 million patients 'are addicted to prescription drugs'

There are currently 1.5 million people addicted to prescription drugs in the UK. The abuse of these types of substances is taking place in the shadows and its extent is still unquantified.

Local GPs need to report their suspicions and collate information to illuminate this problem.

– Keith Vaz MP, Committee chair

Lack of action would lead to "catastrophic consequences", Mr Vaz said.

The committee cited work by the All Party Parliamentary Group for Involuntary Tranquilliser Addiction which estimates that 1.5 million people are addicted to these type of drugs, far higher than those who are in treatment for addiction to illegal drugs.

GPs 'should monitor patients addicted to prescription drugs'

GPs should start collecting anonymous data on patients they suspect or know to be hooked on prescription drugs, a group of MPs has found.

Prescription dugs.
GPs 'should monitor on patients addicted to prescription drugs' Credit: PA

There is a lack of data on misuse and supply of prescription drugs for non-medicinal purposes and the spread and scale of the problem needs to be established, the Home Affairs Select Committee said.

Further efforts to tackle "doctor-shopping", when addicts visiting multiple practices to request specific drugs, are also needed, the MPs said.

Backlog could 'fill Wembley Stadium five times over'

The backlog of immigration cases could "fill Wembley Stadium five times over" and need to be cleared as a matter of urgency, the head of an influential select committee has said.

Labour's Keith Vaz warned the Home Office it would not be able to tackle "deeper problems" in the immigration system until the backlog was cleared.

There are still over 430,000 cases languishing in the backlogs, enough to fill Wembley Stadium almost five times over.

As we have said on numerous occasions, the backlogs must be cleared as a matter of priority.

Only then will the Home Office be able to tackle the deeper problems in the immigration system.

– Home Affairs committee chairman Keith Vaz

Report: UK Borders received 178 complaints every day

A database of allegations of illegal immigration received 48,660 complaints in just nine months - approximately 178 per day - a group of influential MPs have revealed.

The stats were published in a report into immigration and UK Borders by the Home Affairs select committee. They found:

  • Immigration Enforcement officers carried out 2,695 investigations with visits because of allegations made to them from September to May this year.
  • In that time 1,840 arrests were made.
  • 660 people were removed from the UK.

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Only '6% of immigration tip-offs investigated'

Around 6% of public tip-offs about illegal immigration lead to an investigation and only 1.5% results in a person being removed from the country, according to a Home Affairs Select Committee report.

Fewer than one in 50 reports of illegal immigration result in a person being removed from the UK, a group of influential MPs reports
Fewer than one in 50 reports of illegal immigration result in a person being removed from the UK, a group of influential MPs reports Credit: PA

The report also said the now-defunct UK Border Agency (UKBA) had a backlog of 432,029 immigration and asylum cases when it was scrapped at the end of March, which at current levels will take five years to clear.

Read: Immigration targets slammed by academics

Nine names dropped from list at request of Met Police

Scotland Yard has confirmed nine names have been withdrawn from a controversial list of around 100 clients of rogue private detectives as they are still being investigated.

In all, nine names have been removed from the Soca Operation Millipede list at the request of the Metropolitan Police Service as they are subject to live and an ongoing investigations.

– Scotland Yard spokesman

He added that five of the names relate to Operation Tuleta, the force's probe into computer hacking and other alleged privacy breaches, while four relate to other ongoing investigations.

The names of around 100 firms and individuals who allegedly used corrupt private investigators was handed from Soca to the Committee earlier this year on condition it was not published.

Nine clients removed from Soca private detectives list

Nine names have been removed from a controversial list of clients of rogue private detectives on the eve of its publication as they are subject to live investigations, Scotland Yard has said.

The list, which includes law firms, insurance companies, financial services groups and celebrities, is expected to be released on Monday by the Home Affairs Select Committee.

It follows threats from chairman Keith Vaz after the director general of the Serious Organised Crime Agency (Soca) refused to release the document despite an ultimatum from MPs.

Met police clarify access to hack operational info

The Metropolitan Police had full access to all material relating to the Serious Organised Crime Agency's (Soca's) investigation into blagging of private details, which led to the jailing of four private investigators, the agency said.

A spokesman for the Met confirmed detectives received all of Soca's information from Operation Millipede between May and December 2011, but said:

This was essentially huge quantities of electronic data, the hard drives of which were supplied to the MPS.

This material was only put into list format for the Home Affairs Select Committee, and the MPS only provided with the information in that format on July 30.

The statement from the Met added:

In common with Soca, the MPS is not alleging that the individuals or companies on the list have, or even may have, committed a criminal offence.

The MPS is checking the list against its open investigations and will inform the committee when this is complete.

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