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When can members of the Lords claim £300 allowance?

Members of the House of Lords who are not paid a salary may claim a daily allowance of £300 for "each qualifying day of attendance at Westminster", according to the official parliamentary website.

Allowances and expenses payable to unsalaried peers are linked to their attendance at:

  • Sittings in the chamber of the House when formal business takes place
  • Sittings of the Grand Committee
  • Voting in a division
  • Meetings of committees and sub-committees of the House (providing the Member’s attendance is recorded in the minutes)
  • Meetings as a member of the Board of the Parliamentary Office of Science and Technology
  • Meetings of the Ecclesiastical Committee and the Audit Committee

Mirror associate editor: Rules for the Lords 'are wrong'

Kevin Maguire, associate editor of the Daily Mirror, believes that although Lord Hanningfield did not break any rules when he allegedly "clocked in" to claim a daily attendance allowance, the "rules are wrong".

He told ITV's Daybreak: "He may not be breaking any rules but if that's the case then the rules are wrong because I don't know anybody else who could just turn up, nod to an attendant who ticks your name and then you can leave with a £300 tax-free allowance."

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Peer visited Lords 'for 21 minutes on one day in July'

Lord Hanningfield is filmed leaving Parliament via the Westminster tube entrance by the Daily Mirror. Credit: Daily Mirror

The Daily Mirror, who monitored Lord Hanningfield's movements on 19 days in July, alleged that his shortest attendance in the House of Lords was 21 minutes and the longest more than five hours.

In one video, posted on the Daily Mirror's website, the peer is seen apparently entering Parliament via the Westminster tube entrance at 2.37pm and departing again at 3.01pm.

There is no suggestion he broke any rules.

Hanningfield 'can name 50 peers who clock in'

Lord Hanningfield, who served nine weeks of a nine-month sentence in 2011 for falsely claiming £28,000 in parliamentary expenses, suggested it was normal practice for peers to "clock-in" and that "I can name 50 that do it. I see the same people go in and out as I do. I don't want to be persecuted."

Speaking to the Daily Mirror, he said:

Lots of peers go in and check in for their expenses, but they are using their expenses for a lot of things, entertaining, meeting people, employing people.

Clocking in and out of Parliament is only part of being a peer.

By the time I have people at home to help, time I have people in the House of Lords to help me, I spend something like £150 a day on expenses, so I don't really make any profit.

I have to live, don't I? I don't do anything else. How do you think I am going to eat, how am I going to pay my electricity bills?

My income from the Lords will be about £30,000 a year, I pay about that in £18,000 in expense to other people, I'll end up with £12,000 a year."

I can name 50 that do it. I see the same people go in and out as I do. I don't want to be persecuted.

Peer defends 'clocking in' to claim £300 expenses

Lord Hanningfield has defended regularly "clocking in" to claim a £300 daily attendance allowance. Credit: PA Wire

A peer has defended "clocking in" to claim a £300 daily attendance allowance, despite spending less than 40 minutes inside the House of Lords 11 times out of 19 occasions in July.

The Daily Mirror alleges that on 11 of the 19 days that it monitored the peer's movements in July, he travelled to Westminster from his home in Essex, but spent less than 40 minutes in the Lords before returning.

There is no suggestion that the former Conservative member broke any rules.

Confronted about the claims by the newspaper, Lord Hanningfield said: "Being a lord is not just going in the House of Lords. It's the post you have. I have 15 letters a day, I have all sorts of things like that.

"I can do some of it at home, some of it at my office in the Lords.

"I admit I don't go much into the main chamber. If you look at my records since October it's changed dramatically because I've spoken twice.

"Let me explain again. I was trying to get myself organised after a nervous breakdown, a traumatic period."

Enough toilets to meet demand in House of Lords

Lord Sewell assured peers that there were enough toilets in the House of Lords. Credit: PA Wire

Peers were relieved to hear the news that there are enough toilets in the House of Lords to meet the needs of their growing numbers.

Chairman of committees Lord Sewel said there were 57 male urinals, 85 male WCs, and 73 female WCs in the Lords, as well as 40 WCs "not assigned to either gender".

Lord Sewell was replying to a question from former Labour minister Lord Foulkes of Cumnock to assure him that there were enough toilets for members and staff.

Thirty new peers were announced by the Prime Minister in August taking the working total to 785 - making it one of the largest legislatures in the world, second only to the Chinese National Party Congress.

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Doreen Lawrence's 'strength a huge asset' for the Lords

Doreen Lawrence has changed attitudes and policing in the UK, Labour leader Ed Milband said today after it was announced that she would be made a Labour peer.

Labour party leader Ed Miliband Credit: PA Wire

Mr Miliband said: "Over the past 20 years, Doreen Lawrence has had a profound impact on Britain and I am delighted that she will become a Labour member of the House of Lords.

"Since the horrific racist murder of her son, Doreen has shown incredible strength and courage as she sought, and continues to seek, justice for Stephen.

"She has changed attitudes to policing and racism in this country and I have no doubt that her strength and determination will be a huge asset to the House of Lords in the coming years."

List of latest House of Lords peerages announced

The list of the latest House of Lords peerages has been announced, by political party, they include:

  • 14 Conservatives peers, including Daniel Finkelstein OBE, Associate Editor of The Times and Sir Stephen Sherbourne, former Political Secretary to Margaret Thatchery
  • 5 Labour party peers, including race equality campaigner Doreen Lawrence and Sir Charles Allen CBE, non-executive director of LOCOG.
  • 10 Liberal Democrat peers, including former Met Police deputy commissioner Brian Paddick and James Palumbo, co-founder of Ministry of Sound Group.
  • 1 Green party peer, Jenny Jones, former chair of the Green Party.

Former Met Police chief to be made a Lib Dem peer

Former Met Police deputy commissioner Brian Paddick is to become a Liberal Democrat peer in the House of Lords, it has been announced.

Former Metropolitan Deputy Assistant Commissioner Brian Paddick Credit: Rebecca Naden/PA Archive

As announced on Wednesday, Doreen Lawrence, the mother of murder teenager Stephen, has also been confirmed as receiving a seat in the Lords.

Race equality Campaigner Doreen Lawrence becomes a baroness.

Other names on a list of the latest peerages include Jenny Jones, former Chair of the Green Party and Ministry of Sound mogul James Palumbo.

London's Ministry of Sound is a world renowned nightclub and record label. Credit: Press Assocation
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