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Ashworth Hospital deny 'going to war' with Brady

Ashworth Hospital medical director Dr David Fearnley denied that Ashworth Hospital had "gone to war" with Ian Brady.

Ian Brady in the back of a police car prior to his court appearance in 1965. Credit: PA

He said: "I don't think anything could be further from the truth."

"The mental health tribunal process is a legal process, but it's extremely important that we provide the best evidence we can to allow the tribunal to make the best decision it can because of the serious consequences."

Asked if the public platform of the tribunal may have exacerbated Brady's illness, Dr Fearnley said: "I think the difficulty with an individual such as Ian Brady is that he has a complex mental disorder and for many years has been able to publicise his concerns.

"However, we see this as part of an overall problem which our experts are looking into and will continue to provide expert care."

Brady 'remains in the right place for the right treatment'

Ashworth Hospital medical director Dr David Fearnley welcomed the decision from Ian Brady's mental health tribunal to keep him in the high security hospital.

Court artist sketch of moors murderer Ian Brady. Credit: Elizabeth Cook/PA Wire

He said: "We appreciate the time and effort the mental health tribunal has taken in considering this quite extraordinary case and its judgement that Ian Brady will remain on at Ashworth Hospital is consistent with the advice our expert clinicians gave.

"This means Ian Brady will remain in the right place to receive the right treatment by the right people.

"Ashworth Hospital has been subjected to in-depth scrutiny over the past two weeks and the public has been able to see at first hand the quality of care that we offer to all our patients.

"Ian Brady suffers from a severe personality disorder and a chronic severe mental illness.

"However, he still requires high quality specialist care".

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Tribunal: Ian Brady 'suffers from mental disorder'

Ian Brady's mental health tribunal concluded:

The Tribunal has concluded that Mr Ian Stewart Brady continues to suffer from a mental disorder which is of a nature and degree which makes it appropriate for him to continue to receive medical treatment and that it is necessary for his health and safety and for the protection of other persons that he should receive such treatment in hospital and that appropriate medical treatment is available for him.

The reasons for the Tribunal's decision will be announced in due course.

Ian Brady denied hospital to prison transfer

Moors murderer Ian Brady has been told he cannot be transferred to prison from the maximum security hospital where he is being held.

Moors murderer Ian Brady was jailed for life in 1966. Credit: PA Wire

Brady told his mental health tribunal he is not psychotic or insane and should be allowed to serve the rest of his whole life term in prison.

Officials at the high security Ashworth Hospital argue that he is also a paranoid schizophrenic who still shows signs of chronic psychosis.

Ruling due over Ian Brady hospital transfer

Moors murderer Ian Brady will find out today whether he can be transferred to prison from the maximum security hospital where he is being held. Brady claims he wants to kill himself in jail where he cannot be force-fed.

Ian Brady's feeding tube could be seen as he gave evidence Credit: ITV News

Brady told the mental health tribunal that he is not psychotic or insane and should be allowed to serve the rest of his whole life term in prison. Officials at the high security Ashworth Hospital argue that he is also a paranoid schizophrenic who still shows signs of chronic psychosis.

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  1. Martin Geissler - ITV News Correspondent

QC: No-one else would be treated like Ian Brady

Nathalie Lieven QC has been presenting her closing arguments on behalf of Ian Brady at his mental health tribunal.

She's arguing that he is sane and can be safely transferred back to the mainstream prison system.

She says he shows little sign of psychosis. His "paranoia", she says, is based on malevolence and a desire to blame others for his situation.

A court sketch of Moors Murderer Ian Brady

It stems from an incident in 1999 when he was forcibly restrained by hospital staff.

His only psychotic episode was twenty years ago, she says. No-one else would be treated like this, she argues.

He doesn't present a risk to others, she says, he hasn't attacked another patient since 1998.

She can't guarantee he won't relapse, but says if he does, he can easily be returned to hospital.

  1. Martin Geissler - ITV News Correspondent

Brady mental health tribunal enters its final stages

The tribunal deciding the custodial future of Ian Brady is entering it's final stages.

Brady claims he is sane and wants to be transferred out of psychiatric care and back to a conventional jail.

He's been on a hunger strike for many years but is currently fed through a nasal tube. Outside of a psychiatric unit he would have the right to remove that tube and starve himself to death.

Ian Brady spoke publicly for the first time in 47 years as he gave evidence yesterday.

The counsels for all parties are presenting their closing arguments today.

Eleanor Gray QC, acting for Ashworth secure hospital (where Brady is currently held) said he has "fixed paranoid beliefs" and there is "overwhelming evidence that his personality disorders are chronic and severe".

Not one witness at the tribunal had presented any positive reason for Brady to be returned to prison, she added.

Victim's stepfather says Brady is 'just a monster'

The stepfather of a Moors Murder victim has told Daybreak that he was sickened by Ian Brady's remarks where he described his killings as "recreational".

Alan West, whose 10-year-old stepdaughter Lesley Ann Downey was killed by Brady and his partner Myra Hindley in 1964, said he wanted the "monster" to remain in a maximum security hospital.

He said: "I think he's talking a load of rubbish, he's definitely mental."

Mr West added that Brady should get "all the punishment he deserves rather than all the freedom of a prison."

"He's just a monster to be honest, a monster," he said.

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