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Ian Brady rejects notion he is mentally ill at tribunal

Eleanor Grey QC, counsel for Ashworth Hospital, has been cross-examining Ian Brady at his mental health tribunal this afternoon.

She asked him if he accepted that he was ill at the time he was transferred there in 1985 when he was said to have shown psychotic symptoms of hallucinations and delusions.

Brady replied: "Have you heard of Stanislavsky? If you knew who Stanislavksy is... have you heard of method acting? Does that make it clear to you?".

Miss Grey later asked: "Do you accept you have ever been mentally ill?"

"No," the child killer said.

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Ian Brady tells health tribunal: 'I am not psychotic'

Moors Murderer Ian Brady has told his mental health tribunal that he is not "psychotic" and should be allowed to return to prison.

But the child killer refused to directly answer if he would commit suicide in jail if he gets his wish to be transferred from a maximum security hospital.

Ian Brady has been giving evidence at his mental health tribunal. Credit: ITV News/Priscilla Coleman

He compared himself to a monkey in cage being poked with a stick as he said: "You cannot make plans when you have no freedom of control, movement or anything."

Brady's barrister, Nathalie Lieven QC, asked Brady why he was not prepared to be treated with anti-psychotic drugs.He replied: "I am not psychotic."

He went on to criticise psychiatrists as he told the panel that he was "not interested in being analysed".

Brady: Ashworth Hospital is like a 'penal warehouse'

Ian Brady has been describing his life in prison and at high-security Ashworth Hospital, where he has been held for 28 years, to a mental health tribunal.

As he spoke publicly for the first time in nearly 50 years, he defended his perceived "paranoid" behaviour insisting he only took "sensible precautions" to protect himself from staff.

A court sketch of Ian Brady as he gave evidence via video link this morning. Credit: ITV News/Priscilla Coleman

Brady also said Ashworth used to be a "decent and progressive" regime but now resembled a "penal warehouse".

He insisted he had "more freedom" in prison - when he spent time in Durham, Parkhurst and Wormwood Scrubs.

The 75-year-old claims he is no longer mentally ill and should be returned to prison to serve the remainder of his whole life sentence.

He will resume giving evidence after a break.

Brady: I mixed with the Krays and Great Train Robbers

by Martin Geissler - ITV News Correspondent

Asked why he wants to be sent back to the mainstream prison system, Ian Brady makes no mention of his hunger strike, and says:

"I'll never see the excellent conditions I experienced in Durham again, where I mixed with the Krays and the Great Train Robbers".

Notorious gangsters Ronnie (left) and Reggie Kray Credit: PA/PA Archive/Press Association Images

"Nor will I see the good conditions of Wormwood Scrubs in the 1970's. I was the barber there. I shaved the beards and cut the hair of the staff. Can you imagine that happening now?", he adds.

He says he'd "get on fine" with other prisoners. "I have contact with lots of prisoners in Scottish jails and jails abroad. I know what conditions are like there".

So far he had made absolutely no reference to being given the right to die. Rather, it all seems to be about his right to a comfortable life.

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Brady: Perceived paranoia is 'sensible precautions'

by Martin Geissler - ITV News Correspondent

Asked about his "paranoia" in hospital, only coming out at night, protecting himself with a pen, Ian Brady said:

That's not paranoid. That's sensible precautions. I'm not protecting myself against the other inmates, I'm protecting myself against the staff.

In a captive environment, paranoia is unavoidable. Only the prison authorities call it paranoia, prisoners call it sensible precautions.

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