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British troops accused of 'religious humiliation'

British troops have been accused of engaging in "cultural and religious humiliation" of Iraqi civilians after the 2003 invasion.

A dossier handed to the ICC in the Hague alleged British soldiers had committed numerous different forms of abuse against more than 400 Iraqis.

They range from burning prisoners to electric shocks, threats to kill and "cultural and religious humiliation".

Other forms of alleged abuse include sexual assault, mock executions, threats of rape, death, and torture.

Read more: Dossier details abuse cases of 'more than 400 Iraqis'

Dossier details abuse cases of 'more than 400 Iraqis'

Details of a devastating 250 page document alleging "systematic" war crimes carried out by British troops in Iraq are starting to come to light.

More than 400 Iraqi citizens have come forwarded to accuse British troops of war crimes. Credit: PA

The dossier, presented to the International Criminal Court (ICC), accuses the British military of beatings, electrocution, mock executions and sexual assault.

Evidence from cases of more than 400 Iraqis were presented to the Hague court, representing "thousands of allegations of mistreatment amounting to war crimes of torture or cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment".

If pursued, some of the UK's leading defence figures could face prosecution for war crimes.

The formal complaint to the ICC, lodged on January 11, is the cumulation of several years' work by Public Interest Lawyers (PIL) and the European Centre for Constitutional and Human Rights (ECCHR).

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Hague rejects Iraq 'war crime' prosecutions bid

William Hague has dismissed a bid to trigger prosecutions of British politicians and senior military figures over alleged war crimes in Iraq.

The Foreign Secretary said there was no need for the International Criminal Court to investigate allegations of UK forces abusing and killing detainees in their custody.

William Hague said there had been no "systematic" torture by British troops in Iraq. Credit: Lewis Whyld/PA Wire

Individual cases had either already been dealt with by the British authorities or were the subject of probes, he insisted.

Hague told Sky News' Murnaghan programme: "The Government has always been clear and the armed forces have been clear that they absolutely reject allegations of systematic abuses by the British armed forces."

The head of the army, General Sir Peter Wall, ex-defence secretary Geoff Hoon, and former defence minister Adam Ingram are among those named in a 250-page dossier sent to the ICC, according to the Independent on Sunday.

Human rights lawyer: 'This goes right to the top'

The International Criminal Court has been asked to investigate alleged war crimes in Iraq by British soldiers, it has emerged.

A complaint filed by Berlin-based European Centre for Constitutional Rights and a British law firm has accused UK troops of abusing and killing detainees in their custody.

According to the Independent on Sunday, human rights lawyers have presented a dossier of drawing on the cases of more than 400 Iraqis, arguing they represent "thousands of allegations of mistreatment amounting to war crimes of torture or cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment".

Phil Shiner, a solicitor from Public Interest Lawyers, told Sky News: "This is historic. The UK has never been investigated by the ICC. There is clear evidence this goes right to the top."

Dossier on 'abuse' by UK forces in Iraq goes to ICC

A dossier, reportedly detailing allegations of beatings, electrocution, mock executions and sexual assault of Iraqi detainees has been presented to the International Criminal Court, the Independent on Sunday has reported.

According to the dossier:

  • It calls for an investigation into the alleged war crimes under Article 15 of the Rome Statute
  • It says "those who bear the greatest responsibility" for alleged war crimes "include individuals at the highest levels" of the British Army and political system
  • It states UK military commanders "knew or should have known" that forces under their control "were committing or about to commit war crimes"
  • They describe incidents ranging from "hooding" prisoners to burning, electric shocks, threats to kill and "cultural and religious humiliation"

Ministry of Defence 'rejects' claims of Iraq 'abuse'

The Ministry of Defence has rejected the suggestion that UK armed forces "systematically tortured" Iraqi detainees, according to the Independent on Sunday, which reported that a complaint had been filed with the International Criminal Court (ICC) over the allegations.

An MoD spokesman said:

These matters are either under thorough investigation or have been dealt with through various means including through the Iraq Historic Allegations Team, independent public inquiries, the UK and European courts and in Parliament.

As such, further action through the ICC is unnecessary when the issues and allegations are already known to the UK Government, action is in hand and the UK courts have already issued judgments.

We reject the suggestion the UK's Armed Forces – who operate in line with domestic and international law – have systematically tortured detainees.

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Govt 'to fight Iraq prosecutions' of senior figures

The Government has insisted it will fight a bid to trigger prosecutions of former ministers and senior military figures over alleged war crimes in Iraq, according to the Independent on Sunday.

A complaint filed with the International Criminal Court (ICC) has accused British forces of abusing and killing detainees in their custody.

Government to fight Iraq prosecutions, according to a report. Credit: Lewis Whyld/PA Wire

Human rights lawyers have drawn on the cases of more than 400 Iraqis, arguing they represent "thousands of allegations of mistreatment amounting to war crimes of torture or cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment".

The formal complaint to the ICC was lodged yesterday by Public Interest Lawyers (PIL) and the European Centre for Constitutional and Human Rights (ECCHR).

Congolese warlord jailed for 14 years in landmark case

Congolese warlord Thomas Lubanga Dyilo at the International Criminal Court today Credit: REUTERS/Jerry Lampen/ANP/Pool

The Congolese warlord Thomas Lubanga has been sentenced to 14 years in prison by the International Criminal Court (ICC).

Lubanga, 51, was found guilty of war crimes in March, specifically for using child soldiers in his rebel army in the Democratic Republic of Congo in 2002-03.

The court heard how the former militia commander abducted children as young as 11, forcing the girls into sexual slavery and training the boys to use weapons and kill.

It is the first conviction and sentencing since the ICC started work more than a decade ago.