Khalid Sheikh Mohammed

Suspected 9/11 mastermind to face trial

Khalid Sheikh Mohammed and four suspected co-conspirators will stand trial in Guantanamo and, if convicted, could face the death penalty.

Live updates

Lawyer for one of 9/11 accused on his 'peaceful resistance to an unjust system'

James Connell, a lawyer for Ali Abd al-Aziz Ali, one of the five men accused of plotting the 9/11 attacks has been speaking at a press conference today.

He addressed what he said was his client's participation in "peaceful resistance to an unjust system" on the first day of the military tribunal at Guantanamo Bay on Saturday.

He also said that the men has endured years of "inhumane treatment and torture" that has had serious long-term effects and will ultimately infect every aspect of the military commission tribunal.

Advertisement

Families of 9/11 victims react to first day of trial

Nearly 11 years after the September 11th attacks family members of some of the victims have been watching via closed-circuit TV as the self-proclaimed mastermind of the attacks and four co-defendants were arraigned Saturday before a US military tribunal at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba.

Debra Burlingame, whose brother Charles was the captain of American Airlines flight 77, Robert Rigg, a retired firefighter who was injured in the World Trade Centre rescue operation and Lee and Eunice Hanson who lost their three children on United Airlines flight 175 gave their reaction.

Miami Herald: 9/11 suspects refuse to answer questions

Mug_normal

We're entering Hour 4 of the #9/11 hearing and the alleged mastermind hasn't said a word. He spoke, prayed aloud at Bush era arraignment.

Mug_normal

Bin al Shibh is pointedly ignoring the judge. He's got an open Quran on his lap, and prayer beads in one hands. Refuses to answer.

Mug_normal

Bin al Shibh persisted, briefly: "Maybe they are going to kill us and say that we are committing suicide."

Advertisement

9/11 defendant Walid bin Attash restrained after refusing to come to court

One of the men accused of plotting the 9/11 attacks was restrained at the beginning of his appearance before a US military tribunal at Guantanamo Bay to be charged.

Walid bin Attash was tightly strapped into a restraining chair after refusing to come to court voluntarily.

The judge freed him after he promised to behave inside the courtroom.

New rule forbids the use of torture during 9/11 trials

New rules adopted by the US Congress and Barack Obama has forbidden the use of testimony obtained through cruel treatment or torture. It comes as 9/11 suspects Khalid Sheikh Mohammed and his co-defendants appear for a hearing at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba.

General Mark Martins, the chief prosecutor, said the commission provides many of the same protections that defendants would get in civilian court. "I'm confident that this court can achieve justice and fairness," he said.

Load more updates

Advertisement

Today's top stories