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Sandiford Lawyer: Government has human rights 'duty'

The Government has a duty to ensure that the human rights of British citizens are protected and that those sentenced to death, or suspected of or charged with a crime for which capital punishment may be imposed, have adequate legal assistance at all stages of the proceedings.

"This judicial review will challenge the Government's refusal to fund the £2,500 in expenses it would cost for a qualified Indonesian lawyer to represent Lindsay in her appeal against execution by firing squad which will take place on the beach in Bali if the Government do not act."

– Richard Stein, Leigh Day law firm

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UK legal challenge over death penalty Briton in Bali

The Government is to be challenged over its failure to fund legal representation for a British woman sentenced to death for drug smuggling in Bali, a law firm has said.

Lindsay Sandiford, 56, from Cheltenham, Gloucestershire, was given the death penalty by a court last week for taking 10.6lb (4.8kg) of cocaine on to the island.

Lindsay Sandiford pictured with her translator, listens to the judge during a her trial Credit: : Reuters

Ms Sandford has seven days to launch an appeal, but has no legal representation.

Law firm Leigh Day said it is seeking a judicial review of the Government's decision not to pay the £2,500 legal expenses needed.

See also:

Lawyer: Sandiford 'devastated' by death sentence

Defence counsel Esra Karokaro told the AFP news agency that the sentence was "excessive" and that Sandiford's sister has been asking him "about the legal procedures required to file an appeal".

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Death sentence a difficult subject in Indonesian politics

Capital punishment is a controversial subject in Indonesia where Lindsay Sandiford has been sentenced to death for smuggling cocaine, ABC's Indonesia Correspondent George Roberts told Daybreak.

The silent majority support the sentence, but judging by its record so far the Indonesian government is very reluctant to execute foreigners.

First, Mr Roberts was asked whether Sandiford's case was getting much coverage in the local press:

Lindsay Sandiford 'clearly not a drug kingpin'

She is clearly not a drug kingpin - she has no money to pay for a lawyer, for the travel costs of defence witnesses or even for essentials like food and water.

She has co-operated fully with the Indonesian authorities but has been sentenced to death while the gang operating in the UK, Thailand and Indonesia remain free to target other vulnerable people.

Lindsay must file an appeal within the next 14 days and it is vital that the British Government do everything possible to support Lindsay's appeal against the death sentence.

– Reprieve, Human rights charity
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