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Liz Kendall in favour of Assisted Dying Bill

Labour leadership candidate Liz Kendall has said she intends to vote in favour of the Assisted Dying Bill.

Kendall says other countries are more open to discussing death Credit: Reuters

Kendall told LBC radio that she believed the right safeguards - diagnosis of a terminal illness, certification from two doctors and judicial oversight - for the bill to be taken forward.

I believe in giving people as much power and control over what happens to them as possible.

People need the ability to die in their own homes. I believe this will be a step forward.

– Liz Kendall

The Assisted Dying Bill, drafted by Lord Falcanor is due to be debated in the House of Commons on September 11.

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Liz Kendall: I will not step aside from leadership race

Labour leadership outsider Liz Kendall has refused to bow to pressure and remove herself from the contest to help defeat Jeremy Corbyn.

Asked by ITV News Political Correspondent Carl Dinnen whether she would consider standing down after polls showed her in last place, Kendall replied: "Never... you can't stop fighting for what you believe in."

The MP for Leicester West said that only she and Corbyn were the only candidates "making a different case from where Labour's been at the last two elections".

However, she said a Corbyn victory would turn Labour into an "unelectable party of protest".

Liz Kendall refuses to stand aside in Labour leadership

Liz Kendall (centre) and supporters Credit: Stefan Rousseau / PA Wire

Liz Kendall has said she will not pull out of the Labour leadership race to help block the challenge from Jeremy Corbyn.

The shadow care minister, currently a distant fourth, is said to be under pressure to quit to allow the right of the party to shore up the vote for one of her rivals - Andy Burnham and Yvette Cooper.

However an aide to Ms Kendall - seen as the Blairites' favourite - insisted that she had no intention of standing aside.

They said Mr Burnham and Ms Cooper had only themselves to blame for the growing bandwagon apparently building behind Mr Corbyn.

"It's not going to happen. This briefing is nonsense because in a preference vote it doesn't matter how many candidates there are," a spokesman said.

Kendall backs Harriet Harman's policy on welfare cuts

Labour leadership hopeful Liz Kendall has defended the party's interim leader, Harriet Harman after others attacked her for endorsing key Tory benefit cuts.

Liz Kendall and Harriet Harman Credit: REUTERS/Darren Staples / Stefan Rousseau/PA Wire

Liz Kendall said it was essential that the party showed that it had changed if was to regain the trust of voters.

She said "People said to us 'We don't trust you on the money, we don't trust you on welfare reform.'

If we are going to oppose things we have to put something else in its place, because if we carry on making the same arguments we have done over the last five years we will get the same result.

"We have to put forward a different credible alternative and Harriet was absolutely right to say that."

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Kendall: Migrants must work and not claim benefits

Labour leadership candidate Liz Kendall has said the policy of removing tax credits from migrant workers is "definitely something we should look at".

Kendall told the BBC's Andrew Marr Show: "We do have to deal with the issue of people who come here to work.

Labour leadership candidate Liz Kendall on The Andrew Marr Show. Credit: BBC/The Andrew Marr Show

"They must be working and not claiming benefits. But this is about something much bigger - it is about the future of our country and our place in the world.

"David Cameron should be focusing on what is in Britain's national interest and our place in the world, not on internal party politics."

Labour: 'Planned operations going backwards'

Planned operations on the NHS are "going backwards" because Tory mismanagement has lead to more emergency admissions, according to the shadow care minister.

Liz Kendall said the main challenge for the NHS was to "help keep people fit and healthy and living at home" so hospital admissions could be kept down.

Labour concerns about enforcing migrant health laws

Labour's shadow health minister Liz Kendall has raised concerns about whether the measures being unveiled today will be possible to enforce, and will save money:

We will have many questions to ask about the details when they are published but the key tests for their proposals are: can they be properly enforced and will they save more money than they cost to put in place?

The public and NHS staff must be confident that any new measures are about getting taxpayers a better deal and ensuring fairness, not playing politics with our NHS.

– Liz Kendall, shadow health minister