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MH370: Experts to begin examining wing part

Investigators are due to examine part of a wing suspected to belong to missing flight MH370.

Officers look at the debris suspected to belong to MH370. Credit: Reuters

The Malaysia Airlines jet disappeared en route from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing in March 2014 with 239 people on board.

A wing fragment - confirmed to be part of a Boeing 777 - was discovered on the French Indian Ocean island of Reunion last week.

The part has been taken to the French city of Toulouse where experts will reportedly start analysing it on Wednesday afternoon.

MH370 investigators meet in Paris about wing fragment

Investigators from France and Malaysia are meeting in Paris after the arrival of a wing fragment many hope will unravel the mystery of missing Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370.

Malaysia's Department of Civil Aviation Director General Azharuddin Abdul Rahman. Credit: PA

Experts are trying to fathom whether the part broke off the plane, which disappeared on March 8, 2014 while flying from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing with 239 people on board.

The broken wing was found on the French Indian Ocean island of Reunion and returned to the French mainland. The component was a 'flaperon' from the trailing edge of a Boeing 777 wing, a Boeing official said.

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'Second piece of plane debris' found on Reunion Island

A second piece of suspected plane debris from missing flight MH370 has reportedly been washed up on the Indian Ocean island of Reunion.

According to the BBC, the wreckage believed to be a door was discovered south of the city of St Denis.

The first piece of wreckage thought to be from flight MH370 was found on Reunion Island on Wednesday. Credit: Reuters

It comes after another piece of debris thought to be a wing part was found on the same island on Wednesday.

It has been taken to military unit near Toulouse in France which specialises in analysing aviation wreckage.

Airline debris believed from MH370 arrives in France

Airline debris believed from MH370 arrives in France. Credit: PA

Airline debris thought to be from MH370 has arrived in France for investigation, Reuters reports.

The debris, which reportedly arrived at Orly airport, near Paris, at 4.17am, is set to be delivered to a military unit near Toulouse which specialises in analysing aviation wreckage.

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Boeing to analyse debris thought to be from MH370

The wreckage washed up on Wednesday. Credit: Reuters

Boeing is to send a technical team to help analyse debris found on Reunion Island in the Indian Ocean that is thought to be part of MH370.

The company made the announcement following a request from the civil aviation investigating authorities.

A Malaysian official earlier said the debris belonged to a Boeing 777.

Malaysian official confirms plane debris is from Boeing 777

The wreckage washed up on Wednesday. Credit: Reuters

Plane debris washed up on Reunion Island does belong to a Boeing 777, a Malaysian told AFP.

It is still too early to say if it is part of flight MH370 but no other Boeing 777 is thought to have crashed in the southern hemisphere since they came into service.

Bottles with Indonesian and Chinese writing wash up

One of the bottles washed up on the beach has Indonesian writing on it. Credit: APTN

Two plastic bottles with Indonesian and Chinese writing on have washed up near where plane debris thought to be MH370 was found, local media reported.

There were 153 Chinese passengers on the plane which was carrying 239 people. Of these 38 were Malaysian.

French newspaper Linfo said it was impossible to say if the bottles were from MH370 as they could be waste from Asian cargo ships which regularly sail close by.

The piece of debris, believed to be part of a plane wing, has been sent to France for verification.

Families to file lawsuit if debris is missing flight MH370

Relatives of those who on board flight MH370 plan to file a lawsuit against Malaysia Airlines if a piece of debris is confirmed to be the missing aircraft.

Zhang Qihuai, a lawyer representing several families, said a group of around 30 relatives had agreed they would take action if it was proved.

Some families are already pursuing settlements through insurer Allianz.

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