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Thatcher considered deploying troops in miners' strike

Margaret Thatcher considered calling on troops at the height of the miners' strike amid fears union action could destroy her government, according to newly-declassified files.

A Kent picketer clasps hands with a miner outside Cortonwood Colliery in Yorkshire. Credit: PA Archive

Government papers from 1984, released by the National Archives, show ministers were so concerned at the outbreak of a national docks strike while the miners were still out, they considered declaring a state of emergency.

Plans were drawn up for thousands of service personnel to commandeer trucks to move vital supplies of food and coal around the country.

It is thought to be the closest Mrs Thatcher came to defeat in her battle with the miners but the scheme was never implements after the dockers' action petered out after less than two weeks.

Margaret Thatcher's cost of keeping up appearances

As Prime Minister, Margaret Thatcher's immaculately coiffed blonde locks were as much a part of her image as her famous handbag - and newly-released government files show just how much time she spent keeping up appearances.

US President Ronald Reagan talking to Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher Credit: PA

Her appointments diary for 1984, released by the National Archives, show that she had 118 hair appointments in the space of 12 months.

In June, when she was hosting world leaders at an economic summit in London she had hair appointments on five consecutive days.

The diary also confirms her reputation as a workaholic who found it difficult to relax.

Read: Libya had warned Foreign Office of 'embassy violence'

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Cameron compares task ahead to that facing Thatcher

The Prime Minister is moving onto Margaret Thatcher's legacy in government.

"Margaret Thatcher made our country stand tall again, at home and abroad," he says.

He compares his task to that of Mrs Thatcher who also had "an almighty mess to clear up when she came to office".

Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher in April 1982.
David Cameron compared the task facing his government to that of Margaret Thatcher's. Credit: PA/PA Wire

Recounting an anecdote at a dinner, he say: "After a while I said: 'Margaret, if you had your time in government again, is there anything you'd do differently?'

"And she turned to me and said: 'You know, I think I did pretty well the first time around'."

'Miliband Ale: Weaker than Brown' at Tory conference

The Conservative Party conference has created a series of bottled beers for its delegates to enjoy - but with a twist.

The Conservative Party conference has created a series of bottled beers for its delegates.
The Conservative Party conference has created a series of bottled beers for its delegates. Credit: ITV/Lorraine

Conference goers in Manchester can sip on "Miliband Ale: Weaker than Brown", "Leftie Blond" and the "Extra Strong Union Ale".

There is also a beer to commemorate the late-Tory leader Margaret Thatcher, called "Our Maggie."

Osborne to toast 'Our Maggie' with conference speech

Chancellor George Osborne told Daybreak he may toast his speech to the Conservative Party conference today with a bottle of beer brewed in honour of former leader Margaret Thatcher.

The conference in Manchester was opened with a video tribute to Baroness Thatcher, who died in April.

Former Tory Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher.
Former Tory Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher is being remembered at the party conference in a variety of ways. Credit: Phil Noble/PA Wire/Press Association Images

Mr Osborne said: "This is the year in which she died and she was probably this country's greatest peacetime Prime Minister.

"This is an opportunity for the party she led as Britain's first woman Prime Minister to pay tribute to her memory."

Asked if he had tried a pint of "Our Maggie", the Chancellor answered, "I haven't had a chance yet, but maybe after I have delivered my speech I will have a pint."

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Lady Thatcher's ashes laid to rest

Carol and Mark Thatcher attend the service to bury their mother's ashes Credit: PA

Baroness Thatcher's ashes were laid to rest today in the grounds of the Royal Hospital Chelsea.

Members of her family including her children Sir Mark and Carol Thatcher attended a short church service in the chapel of the central London site before a solid oak casket containing her ashes was placed in the ground.

Lady Thatcher's ashes were placed alongside those of husband Denis Credit: PA

A headstone bearing the simple inscription "Margaret Thatcher 1925 - 2013" was being erected on top of her final resting place in the leafy grounds of the hospital.

The country's first female prime minister died aged 87 on April 8.

Margaret Thatcher tribute choices unveiled

Statue
An artist’s impression of how a statue of former prime minister Margaret Thatcher could look outside Grantham Museum Credit: PA

Potential memorials for the late Margaret Thatcher in her hometown of Grantham have been revealed.

Two statues show the Iran Lady with her famous handbag standing tall in centre of Grantham, while a third portrays her in a more relaxed pose sitting down.

Baroness Thatcher's statue could be neighbours with the sculpture of Sir Isaac Newton, who was educated in Grantham and brought up nearby in Woolsthorpe Manor.

Proposals for a statue in Grantham of the UK's first female prime minister, who died in April aged 87, have proved to be controversial with suggestions it might need to be on a plinth to protect it from vandals.

Thatcher declared IRA jailbreak 'worse than we thought'

Margaret Thatcher declared it was "even worse than we thought" after learning the details behind the break out at the top security Maze prison in which 38 IRA inmates went on the run.

Undated file photo of the Maze Prison in Northern Ireland.
Undated file photo of the Maze Prison in Northern Ireland. Credit: PA Wire

The then-Prime Minister penned her thoughts across the top of a secret Government document which landed on her desk five days after the mass escape from the Northern Ireland jail on 25 September, 1983, became the worst prison break-out in British history.

In the immediate aftermath, strongly-worded advice sent by telegram from the Foreign Office to its territories stressed, "You should take every opportunity to limit the propaganda benefit the IRA will reap from the outbreak ... The Government regard the outbreak most seriously."

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