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Elisabeth Murdoch attacks brother's profit pitch in TV speech

Elisabeth Murdoch, the daughter of media tycoon Rupert Murdoch, has distanced herself from her brother James as she warned of the dangers of unethical profiteering during her landmark speech to television executives in Edinburgh.

Ms Murdoch, who founded the production company that boasts MasterChef and Merlin within its output, quoted from her brother's 2009 MacTaggart lecture in which he said profit was the only "reliable and perpetual guarantor of independence".

The reason his statement sat so uncomfortably is that profit without purpose is a recipe for disaster. [The industry and] global society [need to] reject the idea that money is the only effective measure of all things or that the free market is the only sorting mechanism.

– Elisabeth Murdoch

Leveson: 'No hidden agenda' to stifle press freedom

Lord Justice Leveson said that he had no"hidden agenda" to stifle press freedom.

The judge, who is heading the inquiry into media standards, insisted he would not be deterred from fulfilling his terms of reference following reports suggesting he was ready to resign after Education Secretary Michael Gove said his inquiry was having a "chilling" effect.

Lord Justice Leveson, who is heading the inquiry into media standards. Credit: Reuters

He acknowledged there were concerns within the media about the impact of the inquiry, but insisted that he was fully committed to press freedom.

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Mail Online editor questions regulating Stephen Fry's tweets

A snapshot of @stephenfry's tweets today. Credit: Twitter / @stephenfry

The editor of one of the world's most successful news websites today raised the prospect of Stephen Fry's Twitter page being regulated.

Martin Clarke, editor of the Daily Mail online, told the Leveson Inquiry into press standards that additional regulation may be a "dagger to the heart" of British online media.

Mr Clarke was talking about the difficulty of regulating web news publishers and bloggers with large audiences.

He said: "You can't slice and dice the internet up into different bits...Stephen Fry has four million followers on Twitter.

"He can reach more people in one hour than I can, so is he going to be regulated?"

Senior police officers to give evidence at Leveson inquiry

The Leveson inquiry will hear today from Detective Chief Inspector Brendan Gilmour. DCI Gilmour worked on the Metropolitan Police's Operation Glade, which looks into police corruption.

The temporary Assistant Chief Constable of Devon and Cornwall police, Russell Middleton will also give evidence. He was involved in Operation Reproof about an officer allegedly supplying private investigators with information from the police national computer.

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Wednesday's front pages

  • Telegraph: A good day for anyone who cares about our countryside
  • i: Riots blamed on Britain's 'forgotten families'
  • Daily Express: £1 for a first class stamp - Royal Mail free to set own prices
  • Guardian: Verdict on riots: people need 'a stake in society'
  • Daily Mail: Petrol: No.10 fuels panic
  • Times (£): Failings on implants put women in danger
  • Daily Mirror: Out-of-touch Tories - Pie and Dry
  • Sun: Let them eat cold pasty - Osborne tells skint Brits to shun hot food
  • Independent: Ban on filming in British courts to be lifted

Tuesday's front pages

  • Sun: Harrowing CCTV of tragic Thusha, 5 - Gunned down as she danced
  • Daily Mirror: What kind of world do we live in when an innocent girl of five is gunned down as she plays in the aisle of a corner shop?
  • Independent: Most voters see Tories as the party of the rich
  • Daily Mail: Held to ransom by 1,000 tanker drivers
  • Times (£): Bankers and tycoons at Cameron's top table
  • i: PM forced to reveal 'who came to dinner'
  • Daily Telegraph: Cameron's private dinners for donors revealed
  • Daily Express: Petrol strike chaos to cripple Britain

Former Assistant Commissioner 'may have suspected conflict of interest'

Cressida Dick has been involved in some of Scotland Yard's most controversial cases Credit: Leveson Inquiry

Assistant Commissioner Cressida Dick has told the Leveson Inquiry that, with hindsight, her predecessor John Yates might have suspected a conflict of interest because of his friendship with former News of the World Deputy Editor Neil Wallis.

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