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New press watchdog plans attacked by campaigners

Newspapers and magazines have begun to set up a new press watchdog in the wake of the phone hacking scandal - but have been instantly criticised by campaigners.

Plans for the Independent Press Standards Organisation, which will have the power to impose fines of up to £1m, will go out to consultation.

But Hacked Off, which represents some of the victims of phone hacking, claimed the move was a "cynical rebranding exercise" that showed the industry was "determined to hold on to the power to bully the public without facing any consequences".

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Presenter: Where have all the older women gone?

New figures released Labour reveal that only 7% of the total TV workforce (on and off-screen) are women over the age of 50.

Meanwhile, the majority of TV presenters who are over 50 are men (82%).

Miriam O'Reilly, who won an employment tribunal against the BBC on the grounds of ageism, said:

These figures raise the obvious questions of where have all the older women gone and why did they go? Was it their choice to leave their jobs or was it a decision forced upon them?

The broadcasters say they are committed to the fair representation of older women, but the figures don't bear that out.

I'd like to know the reasons why so many talented women have disappeared, while their male counterparts have grown older and still have their jobs.

Older women 'disappear from TV' - Labour survey

Women on television are affected by a "combination of ageism and sexism" that does not apply to men, according to new figures released by Labour.

Harriet Harman, shadow secretary of state for culture, media and sport, asked the six main UK broadcasters how many older women they employ on screen and behind the camera.

The findings were that while the majority of over 50s in the UK are women (53.1%), the overwhelming majority of TV presenters who are over 50 are men (82%).

Former Countryfile presenter Miriam O'Reilly won an employment tribunal against the BBC on the ground of ageism. Credit: Yui Mok/PA Wire

It was discovered that only 7% of the total TV workforce (on and off-screen) are women over the age of 50.

Ms Harman said: "The figures provided by broadcasters show clearly that once female presenters hit 50, their days on-screen are numbered.

"It is an encouraging first step that broadcasters have been open in providing these statistics. Their response shows that they all recognise that this is an important issue that needs to be addressed.

"I will be publishing these figures annually so we are able to monitor progress."

Ms Harman will also be holding a roundtable with broadcasters in the House of Commons today to challenge them to take action.

BBC to remove gagging clauses from contracts

The BBC is to remove gagging clauses from its contracts in the wake of the Savile scandal to make it easier for staff to speak out about any claims of harassment.

A major report into sexism and bullying at the corporation has found that some staff are scared of making complaints about inappropriate behaviour.

But the 80-page report by barrister Dinah Rose said that although sexual harassment was found to be "very rare", there was some evidence of inappropriate behaviour and bullying.

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Home video shows Lloyd family Christmas

In tonight's documentary on the tenth anniversary of the death of ITV News reporter Terry Lloyd in Iraq, we are given an insight into the family at Christmas.

His daughter Chelsey said her relationship with her father "suffered" during her teens.

Lloyd was killed on the eve of the invasion of Iraq ten years ago.

Who Killed My Dad? The Death of Terry Lloyd airs tonight on ITV at 10.35pm.

Terry Lloyd's daughter visits where he was killed

A ITV documentary has followed the daughter of ITV News war reporter Terry Lloyd as she retraces his final steps in Iraq as part of her deeply personal search for the truth about the circumstances surrounding his death.

Terry was killed in southern Iraq ten years ago, along with cameraman Frederic Nerac and translator Hussein Osman, after their convoy came under attack by the US Army.

Cameraman Daniel Demoustier - who was driving the vehicle carrying Terry when they were initially fired upon - survived.

Chelsey Lloyd has returned to where he was shot dead, along with Daniel and presenter Mark Austin, who was also in the country covering the start of the war.

“I need an understanding of what happened that day because I wasn’t there and because it was so far away," she said.

"I need to piece together the events of those days to create a kind of timeline, a picture in my head, to help me.”

Who Killed My Dad? The Death of Terry Lloyd is on ITV at 10.35pm tonight.

Lord Patten: 'Rees-Mogg was a great journalist and editor'

BBC Trust chairman Lord Patten. Credit: PA

BBC Trust chairman Lord Patten said: "William Rees-Mogg was a great journalist and editor, and a distinguished public servant, for example at the Arts Council and BBC.

"My family knew him as a kind and good man, generous, spirited, warm, witty, and the much-loved father of a close and talented family.

"Everyone who knew him will miss him deeply."

PM pays tribute to Lord Rees-Mogg as 'Fleet Street legend'

William Rees-Mogg is rightly a Fleet Street legend - editing The Times through a tumultuous period with flair and integrity. I always found him full of wisdom and good advice - particularly when I first became Leader of the Opposition. My thoughts are with his wife and five children at this sad time.

– Prime Minister David Cameron
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