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Harvey Proctor is 'relieved' investigation has been closed

Former MP Harvey Proctor has said he is "relieved" after he was told Operation Midland is closing and he will face no further action over allegations which he consistently denied.

Mr Proctor's lawyer Nabeel Gatrad told ITV News the investigation has had "far reaching consequences", including leading him to lose his job and having to move abroad.

Officer in charge says Operation Midland was 'handled well'

The senior officer in charge of Operation Midland insisted the investigation was "handled well" and refused to apologise to ex-MP Harvey Proctor who was told he would face no further action.

Speaking at Scotland Yard, Deputy Assistant Commissioner Steve Rodhouse stopped short of saying he was confident there was never a VIP paedophile ring, but stated that the evidence had not reached the right threshold for charges.

Our role here has been to investigate some serious allegations of crime. We've conducted a very detailed inquiry and our role really has been to assess whether or not there's enough evidence to ask the CPS to level charges.

My conclusion today is we haven't reached that threshold.

We've had a long investigation, a detailed investigation into some serious allegations of crime. It's absolutely right that we fully investigated it. Our role has been to identify whether there was sufficient evidence to ask the Crown Prosecution Service to charge anybody in this case, and our conclusion today is that isn't the case. The evidence doesn't reach that threshold.

– Deputy Assistant Commissioner Steve Rodhouse

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NSPCC: We mustn't forget victims of sexual abuse

It is "vital that child sexual abuse allegations are fully investigated by police with an open-minded approach", the NSPCC has said as Operation Midland comes to a close.

This police operation has been at the centre of huge controversy with suspects and their families often under great pressure.

Being accused of one of the most heinous crimes on the statute book obviously casts a dark shadow over those at the centre of such claims.

It’s vital that child sexual abuse allegations are fully investigated by police with an open-minded approach. Whilst many cases are extremely complex, swift resolutions with charges being brought or the accused told they will not be prosecuted is in the interest of all parties. It has taken many years for the public to believe that child abuse is a prolific problem but with disproportionate attention given to some cases over others there is a danger the progress that has been made will be tragically undermined.

Amidst all of the inevitable blame and counter blame as this operation ends we mustn’t forget the victims of sexual abuse who will have suffered life-damaging experiences and, in many instances, are still seeking justice.

– An NSPCC spokesman

Victims do not want 'any innocent person to be pilloried'

Peter Saunders, Chief Executive, National Association for People Abused in Childhood Credit: PA

Alleged child abuse victims do not want "any innocent person to be pilloried, let alone convicted", a campaigner has said.

Founder of The National Association for People Abused in Childhood Peter Saunders said police made an "error in referring to somebody's testimony as 'credible and true'" during Operation Midland.

He called for a line to be drawn under Operation Midland so that police can continue to go after child abusers.

From a victim, survivor point of view I hope that there is a line drawn under that and we now allow the police to go after abusers, helping support survivors of these crimes and we don't spend too much time dwelling on something that went wrong.

Nobody, least of all victims or survivors, would want any innocent person to be pilloried let alone convicted. We do have an issue that many survivors are delicate, hurting people.

The initial investigation and initial accusations obviously carried enough credibility and weight that the police felt justified in launching an investigation. Where they made an error was to refer to somebody's testimony as 'credible and true'. That was very, very unfortunate.

– Mr Saunders

Operation Midland: Missing teen's brother 'disappointed'

Kevin Allen Credit: ITV News

The brother of a 15-year-old who went missing in the late 1970s has said he is "bitterly disappointed" Operation Midland has been closed.

Kevil Allen told ITV News in December 2014 he was "convinced" the teenager was among the victims abused by members of an alleged historic Westminster paedophile ring.

Martin Allen, 15, disappeared on his way home from school in London in 1979 and was never seen again.

Martin Allen disappeared on his way home from school in London in 1979 Credit: Family picture

I am bitterly disappointed Operation Midland has been discontinued.

The team only spoke to me once back in February when they informed me my brother's case was part of the inquiry and asked for a photograph of him. I have not heard from them since.

I sincerely hope the circumstances of my brothers disappearance continue to be investigated thoroughly but today's developments probably mean our mother who is seriously ill, will now never get the answer to the question of what happened to her son.

– Kevin Allen

Operation Midland into historical sex abuse has closed

Scotland Yard has said that Operation Midland, the police investigation into historical claims of a Westminster VIP paedophile ring, has closed.

In October 2014, the Metropolitan Police Service (MPS) received allegations involving murder and sexual assault.

The allegations related to matters over a ten year period between 1975 and 1984 at a number of locations.

After the credibility of the allegations were assessed, an investigation was launched.

Deputy Assistant Commissioner Steve Rodhouse, the senior officer in charge of Operation Midland said that it was right that allegations had been assessed carefully and that they were not "dismissed prematurely".

Investigations of non-recent allegations are extremely challenging and complex for all of those involved.

Victims of non-recent abuse should have the confidence to come forward and know that we will listen to them, take seriously their allegations and investigate without fear or favour.

– Steve Rodhouse, Deputy Assistant Commissioner
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