Live updates

Police investigate death threat aimed at George Galloway

A police investigation has been launched after a death threat aimed at controversial MP George Galloway was sent to the Houses of Parliament.

Officers from the Palace of Westminster contacted the Metropolitan Police's Counter Terrorism Command following the receipt of the letter yesterday.

According to a source, the letter included a threat that the Respect Party MP would "die from a deadly virus".

Scotland Yard tonight said the letter intended for a member of the House of Commons and was being treated as "malicious communications".

'Undercover cop lovers' will not be charged

Several undercover police officers who started sexual relationships with women in groups they infiltrated will not be prosecuted.

The Crown Prosecution Service said there was "insufficient evidence" to charge the officers for offences including rape and indecent assault.

Credit: PA

In a statement the CPS said: "Having carefully considered all the available evidence we have determined that there is insufficient evidence for a realistic prospect of conviction for any offences against any of the officers."

Scotland Yard said it will now consider if misconduct proceedings are appropriate.

Five officers who allegedly had relationships with women activists, which lasted from seven months to nine years, have now been publicly named.

They are Jim Boyling, Bob Lambert, John Dines, Mark Cassidy and Mark Kennedy, who posed as long-haired drop out Mark "Flash" Stone.

Advertisement

Metropolitan Police names undercover pair

The Metropolitan Police has been forced by a judicial ruling to disclose the identities of two undercover police officers who allegedly had relationships with women activists in groups they infiltrated.

A spokesman for the Met said: "In compliance with the order of Mr Justice Bean the MPS has confirmed in its defence that Jim Boyling and Bob Lambert were undercover police officers."

The women are among a number of people who want compensation for emotional trauma allegedly caused by officers infiltrating environmental activist groups.

Their claims for deceit, assault, negligence and misfeasance in public office arise out of long-term and intimate sexual relationships they had with four men who - unknown to them - were members of the Special Demonstration Squad (SDS), between 1987 and 2007.

Mr Justice Bean issued an ultimatum which forced the Met to disclose the names in its defence in order to be able to answer to the claims and had the force not done so within 28 days it would have been taken to admit them.

Metropolitan Police names 'undercover cop lovers'

Credit: PA Images

Undercover police officers who allegedly had relationships with women activists in groups they infiltrated have for the first time been named by the Metropolitan Police.

Last month High Court judge Mr Justice Bean ruled the Met could not use its policy of ''neither confirm nor deny'' (NCND) in response to damages claims brought by women who said they were tricked into forming relationships with undercover officers.

But after the judge issued the force an ultimatum, the identities of the officers have been disclosed in court papers filed as part of the force's defence to the civil claims, the Met confirmed today.

A spokesman for the Met said: "In compliance with the order of Mr Justice Bean the MPS has confirmed in its defence that Jim Boyling and Bob Lambert were undercover police officers."

The women are among a number of people who want compensation for emotional trauma allegedly caused by officers infiltrating environmental activist groups.

Royal police investigated over mishandling weapons

Four Metropolitan Police officers from the Royalty Protection unit are being investigated over an allegation of weapons property being mishandled.

The Met said in a statement: "Four officers, three sergeants and one PC, are the subject of the Directorate of Professional Standards investigations."

They added: "Officers from the Directorate or Professional Standards are investigating an allegation of mishandling of property from the weapons disposal bin by SO14 officers."

SO14 is the branch of the Met responsible for safeguarding members of the royal family and their residences including Buckingham Palace.

The bin in relation to this investigation was reportedly located at Buckingham Palace, although a Met spokesman said he could not confirm this.

None of the officers being investigated was arrested or suspended, a Met spokesman said.

Former Met officer jailed for misconduct

A former Metropolitan Police officer was jailed for 14 months after pleading guilty to misconduct in public office.

Sam Azouelos, a former detective constable, acted as a paid informant for The Sun newspaper between July 2006 and April 2010 the Met said in a statement.

The 35-year-old was also ordered to pay £4,400 in costs.

Advertisement

Man arrested after police find $8m cash during raid

Wads of US notes like the ones found in the London apartment. Credit: PA

A man has been arrested on suspicion of money laundering after he was found with $8.5million (£5.1million) in cash during a raid on an apartment near London City Airport.

Officers executed a warrant at the property in Wards Wharf Apartments at 10.25am.

He remains in custody, a met Police spokesman said.

Account for undercover sex claims, Met Police told

The Met Police has been criticised for its "neither confirm nor deny policy". Credit: Anthony Devlin/PA Archive

A group of women who claim they were tricked into entering sexual relationships with undercover police have urged the Metropolitan Police to offer a defence in court.

The women are pushing for compensation over emotional trauma allegedly caused by officers infiltrating environmental activist groups, and their lawyer today told the High Court the Met has offered "no defence whatsoever" to any of the claims.

The allegations arise from long-term and intimate relationships with four men who - unknown to them - were covertly working for the force between 1987 and 2007.

The Met said it cannot challenge the claims due to its policy of "neither confirm nor deny" (NCND) when it comes to the identity of undercover officers.

At the start of a two-day hearing, Phillipa Kaufmann QC told Mr Justice Bean the Met should file a full defence which did not rely on NCND and, if it failed to comply, its defence should be struck out and judgment entered for the claimants.

Met Police chief: FGM campaign warns people of law

The Metropolitan Police chief said a campaign launched to identify possible victims of female genital mutilation (FGM) "warns" people of the law.

Sir Bernard Hogan-Howe said: "They have an option to stop - the fact they bought a ticket to me is irrelevant.

"They should not be committing a serious attack on a child and they should not be breaking the law."

Female genital mutilation 'won't be tolerated in the UK'

Head of the Met Police's Sexual Offences, Exploitation and Child Abuse Command said female genital mutilation (FGM) "will not be tolerated in the United Kingdom".

Detective Chief Superintendent Keith Niven said:

FGM is an abhorrent offence which includes violent assaults upon children.

It's really important to educate people who engage in this practice so they are aware that this is not a legitimate way to bring children up.

This is child abuse ... and people will be prosecuted if we find evidence of this.

Load more updates