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Xbox One is 'built for the future' say makers

Microsoft's corporate vice president Phil Harrison - a former director at Sony - described the new Xbox One as "built for the future" as the eagerly awaited console hit the market.

Xbox One is a complete, all-in-one system which has the best games, the best online service in Xbox Live, the best entertainment experiences and is built for the future.

With the strongest line-up of games we've ever seen for a new console, pre-orders from fans across the UK are at unprecedented levels...

The games industry is evolving and growing fast, and we are proud to have so many British developers and creators helping to drive the new Xbox One era.

– Phil Harrison, Microsoft

Read: Thousands gather for Microsoft's 'best' Xbox One

Thousands gather for Microsoft's 'best' Xbox One

Thousands of gamers flocked to the midnight launch of Microsoft's hotly-anticipated Xbox One in London, as the technology giant hailed the new console "the best".

The launch of Xbox One in Leicester Square, central London.
The launch of Xbox One in Leicester Square, central London. Credit: PA

Singers Plan B and Katy B provided the entertainment, along with performers dressed as zombies from Dead Rising 3 and a Roman legion from Ryse: Son of Rome, while England footballer Andros Townsend battled it out on stage with a competition winner.

Gaming enthusiasts have flocked to central London for the launch of the hotly-anticipated Xbox One.
Gaming enthusiasts have flocked to central London for the launch of the hotly-anticipated Xbox One. Credit: PA

With the launch of Sony's PS4 next week, Microsoft has a head start on its rival in the run-up to Christmas.

Microsoft has thrown down the gauntlet to its rivals by hailing the hotly-anticipated Xbox One as 'the best'
Microsoft has thrown down the gauntlet to its rivals by hailing the hotly-anticipated Xbox One as 'the best' Credit: PA

"We're proud and excited that Xbox One is going to be the biggest launch in Xbox history," Microsoft's Phil Harrison said.

Read: Crowds await Xbox One midnight launch in cold London

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Crowds await Xbox One midnight launch in cold London

Gaming enthusiasts have flocked to central London for the launch of the hotly-anticipated Xbox One.

Gaming enthusiasts got a taste of the new console.

With the launch of Sony's PS4 next week, Microsoft has a head start on its rival in the run-up to Christmas for its all-in-one entertainment device.

The Xbox One - which goes on sale at midnight - costs £429.99

Crowds await the midnight launch.

Game Changer: How PS4 and Xbox One will transform a growing British sector

London's Leicester Square was transformed into a fantasy world overrun by zombies from and a Roman legion from Xbox games.

Leicester Square was transformed into fantasy land.

Microsoft: Online abuse images 'an evolving problem'

Microsoft's Nicola Hodson said online child abuse content is "an evolving problem", making it "difficult to say whether anyone has done enough".

Ms Hodson told ITV News: "There is always much more to do, so we welcome the focus and we will continue to work hard on this area.

"We're very, very passionate about keeping children safe".

Read: Google and Microsoft to block abuse images

PM admits 'still more to be done' on web crackdown

Prime Minister David Cameron admitted there is "still more to be done" to remove child abuse images from the internet, but stressed "huge progress" has been made.

Prime Minister David Cameron addresses a Downing Street summit.
Prime Minister David Cameron addresses a Downing Street summit. Credit: ITV News

Speaking after a summit at Downing Street, Mr Cameron said: "It's worth remembering we were told that cleaning up searches when people search vile terms, we were told it couldn't be done and we were told it shouldn't be done, for reasons of free speech.

"Well, we're now being told by the industry it can be done and it will be done."

Google: 'There is more that can be done' to tackle abuse

Google's head of communications in Europe said there is "more that can be done" to prevent child abuse images being accessed online via search engines.

Asked why it had taken Google so long to tackle the child abuse content available, Peter Barron told ITV News social affairs editor Penny Marshall, "We have been working on this for many years".

"We've taken proactive action to identify this material online and remove it and report it, but there is more that can be done", he continued.

"Over the last few months we've had around about 200 people working on this to find new ways to deal with the problem".

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Crackdown 'does not stop offenders accessing images'

Child protection expert Mark Williams-Thomas said the Prime Minister should be clear that today's announcement is more about stopping children and young people accessing child abuse images "rather than tackling offenders accessing this material".

However, Mr Williams-Thomas acknowledged on Twitter that it was "a good step forward":

2fd406ca640698cf0cde6a8e9a13a1ee_normal

The announcement this morning by the PM that Google will introduce key word filtering & video DNA is a good step forward.

2fd406ca640698cf0cde6a8e9a13a1ee_normal

2 key distinctions-PM focus is more abt stopping children/y.people accessing child abuse images . Than tackling offenders accessing material

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It is good that children/y.people are a focus - but this is what the PM should be being clear about. Less spin PR more clear strategy

Microsoft: 'Increased collaboration' key to tackle abuse

Microsoft said "increased collaboration" is key to combating online child abuse content, adding, "We need to tackle the core problems of creation, distribution and consumption".

A Microsoft sign on a building in Dublin.
Microsoft said it hasa 'zero tolerance approach to child sexual abuse content'. Credit: Niall Carson/PA Wire

A spokeswoman said: "Microsoft has long been focused on disrupting child sexual abuse, including developing PhotoDNA to strike at the heart of the repeated sharing of the same images time and again across the web.

"Increased collaboration between Microsoft, the Government, CEOP, the IWF, Google and others in the industry is the best way to combat this vile content. Today is a good step forward in this combined effort".

Campaigners warn crackdown 'will not stop abusers'

Campaigners have warned that a crackdown by Microsoft and Google on internet searches for child abuse images will not stop paedophiles using the web to share photos and videos.

Shaun Kelly, head of safeguarding at Action for Children and a member of the UK council for Child Internet Safety said: "This is a positive leap forward in the fight to keep children safe online.

Google and Microsoft announced a crackdown on internet searches for child abuse images.
Google and Microsoft announced a crackdown on internet searches for child abuse images. Credit: Chris Radburn/PA Wire

"However, we must ensure that this level of work is maintained and remains at the forefront of internet protection".

Read: Child protection expert Jim Gamble's blog on why the real problem with online abuse images is the people

NSPCC: 'We must keep one step ahead' on child abuse

The NSPCC has welcomed Google and Microsoft's decision to block images of child abuse via their search engines, but emphasised, "We must keep one step ahead."

Peter Wanless, chief executive of the children's charity, said:

Each image is a crime scene where unspeakable abuse was committed.

As sex offenders get ever more technologically advanced in pushing their vile trade, we must keep one step ahead and this requires a concerted and sustained effort from all quarters.

This is the key child protection issue of a generation - we cannot fail.

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