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Unmanned Nasa rocket explodes after take off

The unmanned Antares rocket exploded a few seconds after take off. Credit: NASA

An unmanned Nasa rocket which was taking supplies to the International Space Station has exploded after take off in Virginia.

Nasa tweeted that it was gathering information to find out what happened to the rocket.

One step closer to finding whether there's life on Mars

We could be one step closer to finding out if there is in fact life on Mars after a spacecraft successfully entered the orbit around the planet.

After almost a year of travelling the universe to get there, Nasa's Maven probe is beginning its one year mission to study the Red Planet's atmosphere.

ITV News reporter Sally Biddulph has the details:

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Spacecraft explores 'mystery' of Mars climate change

Nasa's Mars spacecraft is to explore the "mystery" of climate change on Red Planet.

Scientists confirmed that the Maven science vessel will now be able to beam back data after the mission successfully place it into orbit.

Spacecraft explores 'mystery Credit: Nasa

Mars has a relatively thick atmosphere compared to the moon. The more interesting comparison is that we have a fleet of earth science and weather satellites around the earth for us to understand the earth's atmosphere.

The Mars atmosphere, being something like the earth's - Maven is something more akin to our earth observing satellites.

Somehow Mars changed billions of years ago from a thick atmosphere like earth to the very thin one today. That's the big mystery the team with Maven is trying to solve.

– Astronaut John Grunsfeld

Speaking at a press conference, Astronaut John Grunsfeld from the Nasa Science Mission Directorate said the mission aimed to solve the riddle of the planet's history.

Rocket fires cargo ship at International Space Station

Scientist have confirmed an unmanned Falcon 9 rocket blasted off from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida deliver a cargo ship to the International Space Station for NASA.

The 208-foot tall booster, built and launched by privately owned Space Exploration Technologies, bolted off its seaside launch pad at 5.52am GMT, slicing the night-time sky with a bright plume of light as it headed into orbit.

Ten minutes later, the Dragon cargo capsule perched on top of the rocket was released to begin a two-day journey to the space station, a $100 billion research complex that flies about 260 miles above Earth.

Later tonight, a Nasa spacecraft is expected to reach Mars.

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