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Number of 16-24 NEETs falls slightly on previous year

The proportion of people aged 16 to 24 not in education, employment or training (NEET) was 15.1% from April to June 2013, down 1.3% on the same period in 2012.

The total of 1.09 million young NEETs is virtually unchanged from January to March this year, the Office for National Statistics said.

Just over half of NEETs were looking for work and were therefore classified as unemployed.

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£126 million to be spent on Youth Contract that a third of employers do not know about

A Government spokeswoman said; "As part of the Youth Contract, we are spending £126 million over the next three years on extra targeted support for the 55,000 16- and 17-year-olds most in need of education and training.

"Our education reforms will create a world-class education system that will equip young people properly for both higher education and skilled, sustainable employment."

However figures released today show that most firms will not be taking part in the Government's Youth Contract employment scheme or are even aware that it exists.

Four out of five are not involved in the programme and almost a third of those polled by the Recruitment and Employment Confederation (Rec) said they did not know about the scheme, while 36% had no plans to sign up to it.

Number of NEETs 'still too high' despite drop

The number of young people not in education employment or training (NEETs) has gone down very slightly since the same time last year. The number of 16-24 year old NEETs dropped by 0.2% according to the Office for National Statistics.

The number of young people who are not in education, employment or training is still too high. We are determined to tackle this.

We are spending a record £7.5billion on education and training for 16- to 19-year-olds, we have increased apprenticeship starts with growth across all ages, in all sectors and throughout the country. As part of the Youth Contract, we are spending £126million over the next three years on extra targeted support for the 55,000 16- and 17-year-olds most in need of education and training.

Our education reforms will create a world-class education system that will equip young people properly for both higher education and skilled, sustainable employment.

– Government spokesperson

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Number of 'NEETS' at record high

The number of young people who are not in education, employment or training (NEETS) has risen to a million. A new report shows nearly half of these 16 to 24 year olds have never had a steady job. It warns that many school leavers don't have the skills employers are looking for.

"We know that if young people haven't got on to the first rung of the job ladder by 24, they will suffer the consequences for the rest of their lives. Some will never work. That's why this research is so shocking.

We need to ensure all our young people, irrespective of background, are connected to and prepared for today's world of work before they leave school."

– Shaks Ghosh, Chief Executive, Private Equity Foundation

Labour: Government 'must work harder' on Universal credit

The Government must work harder to get Universal credit right. The best way to get children out of poverty is to get more parents in work.

But as this report shows, their current plans will lock in a parents’ penalty, chip away at the incentives for thousands to work and push 150,000 working parents deeper into poverty."

– Stephen Timms MP, Labour’s Shadow Employment Minister

Government: 600,000 lone parents better off with Universal credit

Save the Children are wrong to assert that lone parents will lose as a result of the introduction of Universal credit - the truth is 600,000 lone parents will be better off under a system which will incentivise work and make work pay.

This is in stark contrast to the broken system this Government inherited which only rewards lone parents who work 16 hours or more.

Under Universal credit, 80,000 more families, including lone parents, will be able to claim childcare support - no matter how few hours they work."

– Department for Work and Pensions
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