Live updates

Norman Lamb MP: Helicopter crash 'absolutely tragic'

The MP for North Norfolk Norman Lamb, in whose constituency the crash happened, has said it is "absolutely tragic" for the families of the crew members involved.

0312c358bb19c35bae6a77cd4f3a4c66_normal

@stuartlong01 I agree. Absolutely tragic for the families of those who have lost their lives.

Lamb: Care cap 'does not include bed and lodging'

The Government cap on care "does not include the cost of board and lodging", the care minister Norman Lamb told Daybreak.

Instead, the Government will set a cap on "the care that you need", such as "help with washing", the Lib Dem MP explained.

"Of course you would want to go further in having the cap lower - I understand that, we all want to do that, but it has to be sustainable.

"And the problem is we are all living longer and the costs of care keep escalating."

He added: "It's a bit rich for Labour to criticise it because over 13 years, they did absolutely nothing."

Advertisement

Minister: NHS to be 'world leader on patient safety'

Norman Lamb said transparency on staffing levels would benefit patients. Credit: PA

Health Minister Norman Lamb said: "We are determined to see the NHS become a world leader in patient safety - with a safety ethos and level of transparency that matches the airline industry.

"The Francis report is already having an effect, with the NHS planning to hire more than 3,700 extra nurses over coming months.

"Experts know that the right number of staff varies by ward and by shift, and should be based on evidence.

"We need transparency on staffing levels, backed up by a strong inspection regime to get better, safer care".

Care minister: 'Unrealistic to think 15 minutes is enough'

The care minister Norman Lamb has said it is "unrealistic" to think 15 minutes is enough time to provide adequate care to the elderly and disabled.

Data obtained from 63 local authorities in England by a care charity found that three-fifths now commission 15-minute visits, despite concerns that short visits "deprive" people of essential care.

Norman Lamb said there were too many examples of councils buying "rushed care visits" Credit: PA

Norman Lamb said there were too many examples of councils buying "rushed care visits": "It's unrealistic to think that 15 minutes is enough time to help people who are older or who have a disability to do everyday things like wash, dress and get out of bed.

"It's not fair on those who need support and it's not fair on care workers."

The minister insisted the Government needed to help provide "better care for the 300,000 people currently getting home care" and for those likely to need it in the future.

Care minister calls for those at fault in CQC to be named

Care minister Norman Lamb has said he believes those to blame for "covering up" the health regulator's failures over Furness General Hospital should be named.

"This culture of covering things up, of gagging orders, pay-offs, this has to never happen again," he said.

He told BBC Radio 4's World at One that he had "a lot of confidence in the new leadership" of the CQC, but stressed the need for "total transparency".

Advertisement

Age UK welcomes plan for compulsory care training

The charity Age UK wants the enforced care worker training to teach staff how to notify authorities about suspected abuse or the poor treatment of the elderly by colleagues.

We also need to make sure that staff with the right values are recruited into caring roles and that they remain supported by a system that values and rewards the important work they do.

– Age UK's Michelle Mitchell

The push for training comes after a series of scandals in which elderly and disabled adults have been mistreated in NHS hospitals and private care homes.

Read: Call for "zero tolerance" on poor care after Mid Staffs scandal.

Read: Government plans to stop a repeat of Winterbourne View abuse scandal.

Lamb demands 'clear standards' for care home training

Health Minister Norman Lambhas told The Daily Telegraph it is not acceptable that there are no “clear standards of the training that must happen in a care home”.

He told the newspaper:

I would not want a loved one of mine - or indeed myself - to be cared for by someone who has no training.

Criminal prosecutions must follow in the "most outrageous" cases of abuse but reforms are needed to improve the quality of care more widely in nursing homes and in pensioners' own homes, he said.

The Liberal Democrat minister said the new regime must not create “a tick box” culture, adding: “But the bottom line is, I don’t want a loved one being looked after by someone who has really no idea what they are doing.”

Report: Compulsory training for care home staff

National minimum standards are expected to be created to protect nursing home residents. Credit: ITV News

Care home staff will be made to undergo compulsory training under Government plans to protect the elderly in the wake of a number of high-profile scandals, The Daily Telegraph has reported.

Health Minister Norman Lamb told the newspaper the lack of basic requirements for training care workers was leaving pensioners in the hands of staff who have "no idea what they are doing".

Proposals expected in weeks will suggest national minimum standards for preparing new recruits to work in nursing homes, according to the report.

Carers who help with tasks like washing and dressing elderly people in their own homes will also apparently be required to complete the training.

Read: Call for "zero tolerance" on poor care after Mid Staffs scandal.

Read: Government plans to stop a repeat of Winterbourne View abuse scandal.

Load more updates

Advertisement

Today's top stories