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May rules out water cannon use in England and Wales

Police will not be able to use water cannon to control serious public disorder, Theresa May has confirmed.

Police use water canon in the Cloughfern area of Newtownabbey, Belfast, in 2013. Credit: Paul Faith/PA Wire

The Home Secretary said she had decided not to authorise forces in England and Wales to deploy the Ziegler Wasserwerfer 9000.

The Metropolitan Police has said it is "naturally disappointed" by Theresa May's decision.

The move could pave the way for a row after London mayor Boris Johnson approved the purchase by Scotland Yard of three of the cannon second-hand from German police last year at a cost of more than £200,000.

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Hogan-Howe: Funding cuts mean difficult decisions for police

The Metropolitan Police Commissioner Sir Bernard Hogan-Howe said funding cuts mean difficult decisions lie ahead for police and society as they hit the Met's ability to tackle the array of crimes.

One of the problems we do have is that you get less and less money spent on policing at the moment. Probably a third less over the next two years, so there's going to have to be some hard decisions made by society and by the police.

It's incredibly important but there are also other things too which we have to see to so we do our best to put as many resources as possible to work our way through it but there's no doubt its a massive challenge.

There's no doubt its a challenge to keep up with the pace, because before the internet existed this sort of crime didn't happen.

– Metropolitan Police Commissioner Sir Bernard Hogan-Howe

Sir Bernard also said that police arrest an average of one person a day for terrorist offences and that the number arrested had risen by a third compared to last year.

Top cop: Police 'skimming the surface' of online crime

The Metropolitan Police Commissioner has said that officers are just "skimming the surface" despite efforts to protect children online.

Sir Bernard Hogan-Howe. Credit: PA

Sir Bernard Hogan-Howe said that while the force had employed more officers in the area, policing the internet remained a "massive challenge". The commissioner said the Met had a squad of 300 officers dedicated to internet security which is likely to grow by 200 in the next year, but added "even then I think we're skimming the surface a bit"

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Theresa May accuses police of 'crying wolf' on cuts

Theresa May addresses the Police Federation Credit: Police Federation

The Home Secretary has told the annual Police Federation conference that they need to stop scaremongering over their complaints about spending cuts.

In a speech, Theresa May said: "For your sake and the thousands of police officers that work so hard each day, this crying wolf has to stop."

She also said that more savings would have to be made in police budgets, saying reform "needs to go much deeper".

Pointing to the Independent Crime Survey, she added that crime had fallen by as much as 25% in England and Wales, despite the cuts already made.

Her comments met with frosty reception on Twitter, with many officers criticising her words.

Met: Public complaint made relating to Lord Stevens

The Met Police said that a "public complaint" was made relating to the former commissioner Lords Stevens over his role and disclosure to the Macpherson Inquiry.

Met: Public complaint made relating to Lord Stevens. Credit: PA

The Met spokeswoman said: "Following the receipt of a public complaint in relation to Lord John Stevens, former commissioner, the MPS made a referral to the Independent Police Complaints Commission on Tuesday, November 4 2014. The complaint has been made in relation to Lord Stevens' role as the then deputy commissioner and disclosure to the Macpherson Inquiry.

"This issue was raised in the Stephen Lawrence Independent Review by Mark Ellison QC, published on March 6 (last year), where he concluded there were defects in the level of information that the MPS revealed to the Inquiry."

IPCC to investigate Lord Stevens over Lawrence case

Lord Stevens is being investigated in relation to the police's handling of the Stephen Lawrence case. Credit: Yui Mok / PA Archive/PA Images

Former Metropolitan Police Commissioner Lord Stevens is to be investigated by the Independent Police Complaints Commission (IPCC) in connection with the inquiry into Scotland Yard's handling of the murder of Stephen Lawrence.

The IPCC confirmed it was investigating the UK's former highest-ranking serving officer over his evidence to the Macpherson Inquiry in 1998, which found "institutional racism" within the Metropolitan Police.

Scotland Yard said it had referred the matter to the IPCC last year after a complaint following the damning review of the Lawrence case by Mark Ellison QC.

A Met police spokeswoman said the complaint was made "in relation to Lord Stevens' role as the then deputy commissioner and disclosure to the Macpherson Inquiry".

I'm glad that they're actually doing what they were supposed to do because this is not the first time that we've asked them to look into it and they've come back with a negative result.

I'm hoping that this time they're going to come back this time with a result that can help us to get further into the truth of what was happening during the investigation into Stephen's death.

– Neville Lawrence speaking to Channel 4 news

An IPCC spokeswoman said: "We can confirm we are independently investigating Lord Stevens following a referral from the Metropolitan Police."

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