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Police officer accused of murdering wife remanded

A police constable has been remanded in custody after he appeared in court accused of the murder of his wife.

Northamptonshire PC Otis Goldsmith, 49, is charged with killing his wife Jill within police grounds.

PC Otis Goldsmith Credit: ITV

Goldsmith, who has 28 years' service with Northamptonshire Police, was arrested after police were called to a house in Wootton Hall Park, Northampton, on Thursday.

He appeared at Corby Magistrates' Court this morning and was remanded in custody to appear at Northampton Crown Court on Tuesday, Northamptonshire Police said.

A forensic post-mortem examination of the victim yesterday gave the cause of death as a head injury.

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Police constable in court accused of murdering his wife

A police constable will appear in court today accused of the murder of his wife. Pc Otis Goldsmith, 49, is charged with killing his wife Jill within police grounds.

Police constable in court accused of murdering his wife. Credit: PA

Goldsmith, who has 28 years' service on the force, was arrested after police were called to a house in Wootton Hall Park, Northampton, on Thursday. He will appear at Corby Magistrates' Court this morning. A forensic post mortem examination of the victim took place yesterday and the cause of death was confirmed as a head injury.

Police officer Otis Goldsmith charged with murder of his wife

Police officer Otis Goldsmith charged with murder of wife, according to the Northamptonshire force.

In a statement, police said he was charged with murder following the death of a woman at 11, Wootton Hall Park on Thursday, March 26.

Goldsmith, 49, will appear ar Corby Magistrates' Court this morning.

A forensic post mortem examination took place yesterday at Leicester Royal Infirmary when the cause of death was confirmed to be head injury.

Police 'should be protected from prosecution' in abuse inquiry

David Cameron is facing calls to protect police and intelligence officers who give evidence over an alleged VIP paedophile ring in Westminster, to guarantee that they will not prosecuted.

It emerged yesterday that Scotland Yard is being investigated over claims that it covered up child sex abuse because of the involvement of influential MPs and police officers.

New claims were also made on the BBC's Newsnight that officers who arrested Liberal MP Sir Cyril Smith on suspicion of hosting sex parties with teenage boys were warned to keep quiet about the investigation or face prosecution under the Official Secrets Act.

Tom Watson, the Labour MP who first made allegations in Parliament about a Westminster paedophile ring in October 2012, today called on David Cameron to shield whistleblowers from that law.

It is now clear that the Prime Minister must guarantee that former police and intelligence officers who wish to help the IPCC with their inquiries will have the threat of the Official Secrets Act lifted.

With this new inquiry it is also clear that the duty of all former police officers, intelligence officers and civil servants who have knowledge of a cover up to come forward.

– Tom Watson

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Serious failures uncovered by Rochdale police report

Seven police officers involved in the failed investigation of widespread child sex abuse in Rochdale will not face any disciplinary action.

Greater Manchester Police has admitted the force was focused on tackling robbery and burglary rather than listening to the claims of young, vulnerable victims who were being sexually exploited by older men.

ITV News' Carolyn Sim reports.

Rochdale police chief: Children 'put themselves at risk'

The key to preventing child sexual exploitation is stopping young people who are "determined to put themselves at risk", from running away from care homes, the chief constable of Greater Manchester Police said.

Sir Peter Fahy insisted that the police had learned lessons after an investigation highlighted "significant failures" in the handling of widespread abuse in Rochdale.

Sir Peter Fahy rejected calls for a full independent inquiry into the force's actions. Credit: PA

The chief constable rejected calls from ex-detective Margaret Oliver for a full independent inquiry into the force's actions.

"The issue is that we still haven't solved the key issue behind CSE (child sexual exploitation) which is: how do you protect vulnerable young people who are determined unfortunately to put themselves at risk, that don't understand the degree to which they are making themselves vulnerable," he told BBC Radio 4's Today.

Asked if he saw the problem as being children putting themselves at risk, he went on: "Yes absolutely. Because of their upbringing, because of their difficult situation and because they are in care, every single day we have large numbers running away.

Police 'failed to recognise scale' of Rochdale abuse

Police have admitted they failed to respond adequately to child sexual exploitation in Rochdale.

IPCC Commissioner James Dipple-Johnstone said:

There was a failure to recognise the seriousness and scale of what was happening in Rochdale.

It is appalling that young girls were being exploited and abused and the police did not handle it properly.

Greater Manchester Police has admitted that the focus in Rochdale was on tackling volume crime such as robbery and burglary.

The force simply did not recognise how to respond to child sexual exploitation on this scale.

– Commissioner James Dipple-Johnstone
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