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Saudi Prince complains that Forbes rich list underestimates his wealth

Prince Al-Waleed bin Talal (right) pictured with Prince Charles in 2010. Credit: PA

Saudi billionaire Prince Al-Waleed bin Talal has severed ties with the Forbes rich list after complaining that the publication significantly underestimated his wealth.

The Prince, who invested £300m (£198m) in Twitter in 2011, is listed as Forbes 26th richest man in the world with a net worth of $20bn (£13.2bn).

But, according to the Guardian, bin Talal informed the Forbes editor-in-chief that he would no longer provide the index with information about his finances because of the lists "flawed" methods.

Al-Waleed's own valuation of his wealth - $29.6bn (£19.5bn) - would rank him at number nine in the Forbes list.

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Saudi prince's hope for Middle East reform

Prince Al-Waleed bin Talal has told ITV News that he would like to see further reform across the Middle East:

I’d like all those Arab countries who did not have an instability or revolution to wake up and immediately to reform and change before this tide reaches them

When asked if this included Saudi Arabia the prince replied: “All countries – no country is immune. Everyone who thinks he is immune, as you say in English, ‘he is talking rubbish’”.

Saudi prince: Assad will not flee Syria

Prince Al-Waleed bin Talal speaking to ITV News

Speaking to ITV News, Prince Al-Waleed bin Talal has predicted that Syrian president Bashar Assad will not flee Syria, and that the conflict with drag on for years.

He explained why Western powers are steering clear:

"Who are the insurgents, are they united? Are they extremists? Are they Al Qaeda based? Are they fanatics? Really, we don’t know who they are.

"They have groups there all over the place. That’s why the West, even Saudi Arabia, has not been very aggressive in supporting the insurgents over there."

Saudi prince: Obama 'not been successful in our region'

In a rare interview, Prince Al-Waleed bin Talal has told ITV News that he has hopes that President Obama's second term will see him focus more on the Middle East:

Frankly speaking, Obama has not been very successful in our region here. I hope a second term will prove to be different to his first term.

Right now, I think with the economic situation in the States stabilising, Europe stabilising, he can give a lot more attention to the Middle East.

We can only say we can only hope he will give more attention to the Middle East, because it’s needed badly.

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