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Unite consults on industrial action over pay deal

The Unite union says it will be consulting its health service members on possible industrial action following the Government's refusal to sanction the recommended one per cent pay rise for all NHS staff.

Unite said the Health Secretary’s decision to accept the recommendation of the independent Pay Review Body, for only those not receiving annual increments, was a "divide and rule" tactic and will see about 45 per cent of the NHS workforce getting no cost of living pay increase at all from April 1.

Rachael Maskell, of Unite, said: “Jeremy Hunt has adopted a divide and rule tactic which calls into serious question the relevance of the so-called independent PRB.

“He is deliberately muddying the waters by trying to imply that the annual increment that staff receive, as they gain more skills to benefit patients throughout their careers, is part of the annual pay increase – it is not. It is despicable that Hunt has adopted such an underhand tactic."

Treasury: We must continue public sector pay restraint

Chief Secretary to the Treasury Danny Alexander has said the Government needs to continue with "public sector pay restraint" to rectify the nation's finances.

Public sector workers make a vital contribution to the effective delivery of public services. We need to continue with public sector pay restraint in order to put the nation’s finances back on a sustainable footing.

We are delivering on our commitment to a one per cent pay rise for all except some of the most senior public sector workers.

– Chief Secretary to the Treasury Danny Alexander

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600,000 NHS workers not eligible for 1% pay increase

ITV News Deputy Political Editor Chris Ship has tweeted:

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Half of NHS staff to receive 1% pay rise

ITV News Deputy Political Editor Chris Ship has tweeted:

Government to announce public sector pay deal

Those working in the public sector will find out today by how much their pay will increase in the next financial year.

The Government is set to announce its plans for public sector pay later today. Credit: Press Association.

The Government is to give its response later to a number of reports from review bodies.

Unions representing more than one million NHS workers across the UK have pressed for a decent rise after two years of wage freezes followed by a 1% increase.

'Bullying and pressure' behind some unpaid overtime

A TUC report into an increase in the number of public sector staff doing overtime for free says that will some staff put in extra hours because of commitment to their job, there is also evidence of "bullying and excessive management pressure."

Times are tough for public sector workers. As the cuts bite and fewer staff find themselves having to take on more work, unpaid overtime inevitably grows.

Some of the increase will be down to the professionalism and commitment of staff who want to provide decent services.

But there is also evidence of bullying and excessive management pressure in some workplaces.

It is not surprising that morale is so low across the public sector. Hours are up, workload has increased, pay has been frozen, pensions cut and jobs insecure as public sector staff know that 60% of the cuts are still to come.

– TUC general secretary Frances O'Grady

250,000 more women doing unpaid overtime

An increase in the number of workers doing unpaid overtime in the public sector has almost entirely been driven by 250,000 more women working extra hours for free, according to a study by the TUC.

250,000 more women are working extra hours for free, the TUVC said Credit: PA

In 2003, more men than women did unpaid overtime in the public sector, but the position has been reversed, the research found.

One in four public sector workers puts in at least an extra hour a week, the TUC said.

Around one in six staff in private firms worked extra hours for no pay, a figure which has largely remained unchanged over the past decade, although the amount of unpaid overtime has increased.

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