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Rebekah Brooks returns to News UK on first day as CEO

Rebekah Brooks has returned to work at News UK as chief executive this morning.

Ms Brooks was appointed as CEO of News UK last week and returns to the Rupert Murdoch-controlled News Corp a year after she was cleared of any wrong-doing in the phone hacking scandal.

Her appointment isn't without its critics, however.

Shadow culture secretary Chris Bryant, whose phone was one of those hacked by those working at the now defunct News of the World said:

Rupert Murdoch has just stuck two fingers up to the British public and the thousands of people whose phones were hacked by News International.

Hundreds of ordinary journalists lost their jobs when Mr Murdoch closed the News Of The World, but it seems Rebekah Brooks is to get very special treatment.

– Shadow culture secretary Chris Bryant

'Brooks' return shows News UK culture hasn't changed'

The return of Rebekah Brooks to News UK as chief executive of the newspaper operation sends "a signal" that the culture at the organisation "has in no way changed", claims hacking victim Christopher Jefferies.

Jefferies, who the now defunct News of the World falsely linked to the murder of Joanana Yates, told ITV News: "As far as I'm concerned Rebekah Brooks is somebody who has never publically apologised."

ITV News' Rohit Kachroo reports:

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'Murdoch has just stuck two fingers up to the British public'

Rupert Murdoch has come under fire for reinstating Rebekah Brooks Credit: Drew Angerer / Pool via CNP

Rupert Murdoch has "stuck two fingers up" to the public with his decision to appoint Rebekah Brooks CEO of his newspaper operation, claims one of the victims of the News Of The World's phone-hacking scandal.

Shadow culture secretary Chris Bryant, whose phone was one of those that was hacked by the now closed newspaper, said he felt Brooks was getting special treatment in the wake of the scandal.

He said: "Rupert Murdoch has just stuck two fingers up to the British public and the thousands of people whose phones were hacked by News International.

"Hundreds of ordinary journalists lost their jobs when Mr Murdoch closed the News Of The World, but it seems Rebekah Brooks is to get very special treatment."

Rebekah Brooks appointed CEO of Murdoch's News UK

File photo dated 18/03/10 of Rupert Murdoch and Rebekah Brooks Credit: PA

Rebekah Brooks has been appointed CEO of Rupert Murdoch's UK newspaper operation, the company has announced.

It was reported last week that Ms Brooks was returning to Rupert Murdoch-controlled News Corp a year after she was cleared of phone hacking.

Brooks cleared of all charges after eight-month trial

It's almost three years since managers at the News of the World were first arrested. While the jury is still deliberating over two counts facing Andy Coulson, for Rebekah Brooks the wait is over after she was acquitted of all charges.

Once the most powerful woman in the British media, her extraordinary career has been on hold during the 8 month trial.

Political Correspondent Romilly Weeks reports:

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MPs warned not to make phone-hacking comments

Former Downing Street director of communications Andy Coulson will stand trial at the Old Bailey next week. Credit: Anthony Devlin/PA Archive/Press Association Images

Politicians at Westminster have been warned not to comment in public on upcoming trials over newspaper phone hacking.

The coming week will see former Downing Street director of communications Andy Coulson and ex-News International chief executive Rebekah Brooks stand trial at the Old Bailey.

The case has been at the centre of political debate for more than two years, but Solicitor General Oliver Heald has acted to counter the risk of commentary prejudicing the proceedings, which are expected to last for several months.

Parliamentary privilege means a politician can theoretically talk about a live case in the House of Commons without fear of prosecution.

Ex-NOTW staff cannot take appeal to Supreme Court

Five defendants, including former News of the World (NOTW) editor Rebekah Brooks and former Government spin doctor Andy Coulson will not be able to take an appeal to the Supreme Court over the prosecution of alleged phone hacking charges, judges ruled today.

The five former NOTW staff lost a last-ditch bid to attempt to block their prosecution over the reported charges.

Lord Chief Justice Lord Judge said the defendants would only pay legal costs if they are convicted.

Judges allow reporting of hacking defendants' names

Court judges have allowed the names of the five defendants involved in the hacking inquiry to be reported today after they lost a bid to block their prosecution over alleged phone hacking.

The former News of the World staff, including Rebekah Brooks and Andy Coulson have denied the charges.

But three appeal court judges, led by Lord Chief Justice Lord Judge, ruled today:

Contrary to the submission on behalf of the appellants, the resulting situation is not lacking in legal certainty.

We can see no possible prejudice to the fairness of the forthcoming trial.

We must not be unrealistic - there can hardly be anyone in the country who does not know to whom this case applies.

Hacking charges denied by former NOTW staff

Former Government spin doctor Andy Coulson and ex-News International chief executive Rebekah Brooks. Credit: ITV News

Five defendants, including former News of the World (NOTW) editors Rebekah Brooks and Andy Coulson have denied conspiracy to intercept mobile phone voicemails between October 3 2000 and August 9 2006.

They had tried to get the case dismissed at the Court of Appeal, arguing that accessing voicemails after they had been listened to by the recipient was not covered by the Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act 2000, under which they are charged.

But Lord Chief Justice Lord Judge dismissed their appeals today.

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