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Richard III's tomb proposals revealed

What the tomb could look like Credit: Richard III Society

The design proposals for the tomb where Richard lll will finally be laid to rest have been unveiled.

It has been confirmed his remains will be reburied in Leicester, after they were discovered underneath a car park in the City last year. No date has been set for the reinterment but it is expected to take place next spring.

The tomb design was commissioned by Philippa Langley – from the Richard lll Society who was behind the search.

The design was undertaken by a team of specialists with more than 40 years of research into Richard III. It was first proposed in drawing form in September 2010, and then preliminary images were presented in August 2011.

The tomb design was commissioned by Philippa Langley – the originator who searched for Richard III Credit: Richard III Society

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University of Leicester wins battle over Richard III burial

The reconstructed face of King Richard III was unveiled on Tuesday. Credit: PA

The battle for the final resting for King Richard III seems already won, with the decision solely in the hands of the university experts.

The Ministry of Justice (MoJ) today confirmed that it was the University of Leicester's decision to make as they had been granted permission to exhume the monarch's body.

York Council had confirmed it was writing to the Queen and the MoJ to lay claim to the remains.

In a statement the Ministry of Justice said today:

"The licence we issued states that the applicant (the University of Leicester) would, no later than August 31, 2014, deposit the remains at Jewry Wall Museum or have them interred at St Martin's Cathedral or in a burial ground in which interments may legally take place.

"The precise location of reburial is now for the University of Leicester."

New exhibition chronicles the search for King Richard III

King Richard III will be brought to life in two new exhibitions opening tomorrow, following the discovery of the monarch's remains, under a council car park.

Leicester's Search for a King chronicles the search and excavation of the king's body by archaeologists from the University of Leicester.

Read: DNA results confirm King Richard III was buried in Leicester

Archeologists from the University of Leicester confirmed earlier this week that the body of Richard III had been found Credit: Rui Vieira/PA Wire

A new interactive exhibition will open at the battlefield where Richard III was slain at the Battle of Bosworth in 1485.

Earlier this week experts confirmed "beyond reasonable doubt", that the body exhumed at Grey Friars in Leicester, was that of the former monarch.

Read: First full picture of Richard III skeleton

The battle continues over where the king's remains will be reburied, with city leaders in York writing to the Queen, in a bid to get the Yorkist king's remains returned to his "spiritual home".

Read: Richard III 'had West Midlands accent'

Richard III 'had a West Midlands accent'

The face of King Richard III is unveiled to the media at the Society of Antiquaries, London. Credit: Press Association

Researchers at the University of Leicester believe Richard III may have had a West Midlands accent.

The language, spelling and grammar patterns from two letters written by Richard III indicate he spoke in dialect consistent with the West Midlands region, according to experts. Dr Shaw explains:

"Like today, there were various dialects around the country. Unlike today, individuals were more likely to spell words in ways that reflected their local dialect."

"The language used [...] largely reflects the relatively standard, London-derived spelling system also used by Richard’s secretaries. However, there is also at least one spelling he employs that may suggest a West Midlands accent."

Listen to Richard III's letter read by Dr Philip Shaw from the University of Leicester.

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Picture: Did this weapon kill Richard III?

Royal Armouries weapons
Experts at the Royal Armouries in Leeds have revealed the sort of weapons which may have been used to kill Richard III Credit: ITV Calendar

Experts at the Royal Armouries in Leeds have revealed the sort of weapons which may have been used to kill Richard III.

Archaeologists in the midlands yesterday confirmed they had discovered the body of the last king of the House of York. Now a Leeds historian is piecing together just what happened to the man who gave battle in vain.

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The face of Richard III officially unveiled to the world's media

After centuries of speculation, the face of King Richard III has been unveiled

A reconstruction of the head of King Richard III has been unveiled to the world's media in London following yesterday's announcement that his skeleton had been found under a Leicester car park.

The model was built using a CT scan taken of the king's skull by the archaeological dig.

The unveiling is being held at The Society of Antiquaries in London.

Read about the discovery of the King of England in a Leicester Car Park here.

The face of King Richard III to be unveiled today

A facial reconstruction of King Richard III is to be unveiled today, following yesterday's announcement that his skeleton had been found, under a car park in Leicester.

Read: Search for Richard III ends with car park dig.

Based on a CT scan, taken by the team behind the archaeological dig, the 'face' will be revealed today at The Society of Antiquaries in London.

The 'face' of King Richard III based on a CT scan image Credit: Channel 4

Last September The University of Leicester discovered a skeleton, thought to be that of the former King, who died in the Battle of Bosworth in 1485.

Due to extensive DNA tests, it was not confirmed until yesterday, that the skeleton did in fact belong to Richard III.

To read more on the search for King Richard III, visit the ITV News Central website.

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