HMS Queen Elizabeth in numbers

The Queen will formally name the Royal Navy's biggest ever ship today, with whisky replacing the more traditional champagne at the ceremony.

Sir John 'Sandy' Woodward

Remembering Sir John 'Sandy' Woodward

Sir John 'Sandy' Woodward has died, age 81. He'll be remembered most for his role leading British forces during the Falklands war in 1982

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Rare for MoD to give location of nuclear submarines

Deputy Political Editor Chris Ship has tweeted:

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NEW: UK submarine HMS Tireless is now searching for the Malaysian plane in the Indian Ocean

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MoD never gives location of UK's Trafalgar-class nuclear submarines. However they have confirmed Tireless' location in southrn Indian Ocean

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Royal Navy under 'significant manpower pressure'

The First Sea Lord, Admiral Zambellas, has acknowledged that the Royal Navy is "under significant manpower pressure". He said in a statement:

It is quite true that the Royal Navy is under significant manpower pressure, in key specialist skills to meet today's commitments.

This is a recognised leadership and management challenge that is part and parcel of the Royal Navy's renaissance, and we are working closely within and across defence to meet that challenge, but also to chase the opportunities it offers. But, I do not expect it to throw us off track.

– First Sea Lord Admiral Zambellas

Ex Forces chief: 'Terrible question mark' over Navy

Lord Bramall, who led the Army as Chief of General Staff during the Falklands War and was later promoted to the top military post of Chief of Defence Staff, said there was "a terrible question mark" over whether the required numbers of reservists can be found.

Lord Bramall is a former Chief of Defence Staff. Credit: Tony Harris/PA Archive/Press Association Images

"If you are not going to get the reserves then you should not run down frontline troops as quickly as you intended to do," he told the Sunday Telegraph.

"The logical thing is you do not run them down until you achieve the build-up of reserves but finance is still driving the agenda."

Lord Bramall added: "The Royal Navy does not have enough surface ships to carry out the everyday duties of projecting influence, tackling piracy and all the other things they have to do all over the world.

"The defence cuts have been predominantly driven by finance, and the military has had to make the best of it."

Read: Navy 'doesn't have enough ships'

Ex-forces chief: Royal Navy 'doesn't have enough ships'

The Royal Navy does not have enough ships to carry out its "everyday duties", and cuts in the ranks of the Army should be put on hold until more reservists can be recruited, a former head of Britain's armed forces has said.

The Royal Navy Frigate H.M.S. Iron Duke. Credit: John Stillwell/PA Archive/Press Association Images

Field Marshal Lord Bramall told the Sunday Telegraph that the armed forces were having to "make the best of" reductions that were driven by financial considerations.

His warning came as Defence Secretary Philip Hammond said he was "very confident" the Army can reach its target of 30,000 reservists by 2018, despite concerns the recruitment drive has started slowly.

Royal Navy warship due to arrive in Gibraltar

HMS Westminster, a type 23 frigate, in the Naval Harbour in Portsmouth. Credit: PA Wire

A Royal Navy warship is expected to arrive in Gibraltar later after more than 40 Spanish boats were involved in a confrontation with the British authorities.

The arrival of HMS Westminster, a type 23 frigate, is not part of Britain's response to the growing row.

The vessel left Portsmouth naval base in Hampshire six days ago to join nine other vessels taking part in a pre-planned international training exercise called Cougar '13 in the Mediterranean and Gulf.

Cougar '13 is a long-planned deployment involving four Royal Navy warships, the lead commando group from 3 Commando Brigade Royal Marines and elements of naval air squadrons.

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Royal Navy 'seized 22 bales of pure cocaine'

Sailors aboard HMS Lancaster seized 22 bales of pure cocaine from a speedboat near Puerto Rico, the Ministry of Defence has said.

Sailors onboard HMS Lancaster carry away part of a major drugs haul
Sailors onboard HMS Lancaster carry away part of a major drugs haul Credit: MoD

The drugs, which have an estimated street value of £100 million, were handed over to the Coast Guard Cutter Sapelo and then the authorities in Puerto Rico.

Royal Navy mobilised pursuit boat and helicopter

The Royal Navy mobilised a Lynx helicopter and high-speed pursuit boat in order to intercept the speedboat suspected of smuggling drugs.

A high speed pursuit boat intercepts the 30ft drug carrying vessel Credit: MoD

The Ministry of Defence said that the three people on board initially tried to dispose of the evidence by throwing the drugs overboard, but this was recovered by divers.

The suspected drugs smugglers ultimately cooperated with the Royal Navy

The MK8 Lynx helicopter launched from HMS Lancaster in the drugs raid Credit: MoD
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