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Murdoch's marriage 'broken down irretrievably'

Rupert Murdoch, centre, and his wife Wendi pictured at last year's Wimbledon men's final. Credit: PA

Rupert Murdoch's divorce filing said the "relationship between husband and wife has broken down irretrievably," according to a New York Times report.

It added that a spokeswoman for News Corporation, his media company, confirmed that it was Mr Murdoch who had made the filing.

The spokeswoman added that the divorce would have no impact on the company.

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Rupert Murdoch's three wives and six children

Rupert Murdoch's first marriage to flight attendant Patricia Booker took place in 1956 and lasted 11 years. They had one daughter, Prudence, in 1958.

Rupert Murdoch with his then wife Anna in 1991 Credit: Martin Keene/PA Archive/Press Association Images

In 1967, he married the Scottish-born journalist Anna Torv after the pair met at his Sydney-based newspaper The Daily Telegraph.

They had three children together - Elisabeth, Lachlan and James - over the course of more than 30 years of marriage.

Within a month of their divorce in 1999, Murdoch married Chinese-born TV executive Wendi Deng with whom he had two more daughters - Grace and Chloe.

Wendi Deng best known for slap on pie-thrower

Wendi Deng, in a pink jacket, leans to slap a protester, seen on the far left of the image.

Wendi Deng is perhaps best known in Britain for defending husband Rupert during a physical attack at a parliamentary hearing in 2011.

The Chinese-born businesswoman was seen landing a slap on the face of activist Johnnie Marbles, who had attempted to throw a foam pie at Mr Murdoch.

Murdoch: 'Brave' Thatcher made Britain 'successful'

Media tycoon Rupert Murdoch claimed Britain is "far more successful" because of Baroness Thatcher's "brave leadership".

Mr Murdoch praised the former Prime Minister's role in facing down the trade unions in the 1980s and said the Government made it possible for News International to survive a year of industrial action fighting against a move of operations to Wapping, East London.

Rupert Murdoch. Credit: Lionel Hahn/ABACA USA

The tycoon wrote in The Times (£): "Mrs Thatcher understood that risk was a vital ingredient in a free enterprise society. She understood that such a society had to be led by a government with backbone.

"After the Second World War, in which the country lost a second generation of its finest men, Britain had created a dependency state. It killed off aspiration.

"In 1979 Margaret Thatcher set about its rehabilitation. She put the economy on a sound footing, she ended a culture of crippling strikes, she encouraged entrepreneurs to come here and set up their businesses.

"Thanks to her I have experienced in Britain many of my defining moments as a businessman, a Britain that is far more successful as a result of her brave leadership."

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Rupert Murdoch 'has dinner with UKIP leader Farage'

The Daily Telegraph is reporting that the News International chairman Rupert Murdoch invited the leader of the UK Independence Party for dinner at his flat in London on Tuesday evening.

Mr Murdoch tweeted this evening about how Nigel Farage, whose party finished a shock second in the Eastleigh by-election, was "reflecting opinion":

Rupert Murdoch hints that Page 3 is 'so last century'

News Corp boss Rupert Murdoch has hinted that he believes Page 3 of The Sun may be becoming outdated.

Responding to an anonymous Twitter user who said it is "so last century", Mr Murdoch said he was "considering" whether he agreed.

Page 3 of the tabloid has long been reserved for pictures of topless or scantily-clad woman.

Murdoch: 'Chinese still hacking us'

News Corporation chairman Rupert Murdoch has suggested hackers are "still" trying to gain access to his companies' servers.

News Corp's Wall Street Journal and the independently-owned New York Times revealed in recent days that their networks were penetrated at the weekend, potentially by China-based hackers.

Times cartoonist 'unaware' piece would be published on Holocaust Memorial Day

Sunday Times cartoonist Gerald Scarfe has issued a statement regarding the criticism he faced over a a cartoon published in the newspaper:

First of all I am not, and never have been, anti-Semitic.

The Sunday Times has given me the freedom of speech over the last 46 years to criticise world leaders for what I see as their wrong-doings.

This drawing was a criticism of Netanyahu, and not of the Jewish people: there was no slight whatsoever intended against them.

I was, however, stupidly completely unaware that it would be printed on Holocaust Day, and I apologise for the very unfortunate timing.

Yesterday News Corp chairman Rupert Murdoch was forced to apologise for the cartoon, which he described as "grotesque" and "offensive".

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