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Possibility of a 'catastrophic famine' to hit South Sudan

Caroline Anning from the charity Save the Children has warned the situation in South Sudan is similar to the east African famines in the 1980s.

Speaking to ITV News' Dan Rivers she said: "If it continues and we can't get the help we need, we could be looking at a catastrophic famine."

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Charity launches donation drive for South Sudan

Save the Children have launched an appeal for donations for the African nation of South Sudan, which is on the brink of a famine.

The children's charity said that without immediate action the situation will deteriorate catastrophically, as across the world’s youngest nation, 2.5 million children are struggling without the basic means to survive.

ITV News correspondent Dan Rivers reports:

The United Nations has already warned that without a cash injection, South Sudan will face the worst starvation in Africa since the 1980s.

Clinics 'dealing with influx of malnourished children'

Pete Walsh, Save the Children’s Country Director in South Sudan, has spoken of the need for funds to provide Sudanese families with aid.

A child waits for food in a South Sudanese village. Credit: ITV News

He said: "Save the Children’s feeding clinics are dealing with an influx of severely malnourished children, brought in by terrified mothers, many of whom arrive after walking for miles.

"We urgently need to raise funds to provide families with life-saving food supplements."

Syrian babies 'dying in incubators due to power cuts'

Newborns freezing to death in hospital incubators, patients opting to be knocked out with metal bars for lack of anesthesia, surging cases of polio.

A new report published by charity Save the Children paints a dire picture of Syria's collapsing healthcare system.

A baby survivor at a hospital in Aleppo Credit: REUTERS/Hosam Katan

The report, issued by charity Save the Children, said some 60 percent of Syria's hospitals have been damaged or destroyed since the start of the three-year-old conflict and nearly half of its doctors have fled the country.

In Aleppo, one of the worst-hit cities, only 36 of its 2,500 doctors remain.

The report says increasing numbers of children are suffering and dying from diseases that would have been previously treated or prevented.

Up to 80,000 children across the Syria have contracted polio, even though the illness was eradicated across Syria in 1995.

Over 140,000 people have died in the war, which started as a peaceful protest movement against President Bashar al-Assad and degenerated into civil conflict.

UK Syrian refugee announcement welcomed by charity

Britain's decision to resettle some of the "most vulnerable" Syrian refugees has been welcomed by Save the Children, as it was "consistent with the UK Government's leadership".

Speaking from Jordan, Karl Schembri told Daybreak the UK had provided "generous humanitarian aid" to the millions of Syrian refugees who had fled to neighbouring Lebanon, Jordan and Iraq.

However, he warned the amount Britain would re-home was just "the tip of the iceberg", adding that it should take in thousands, not hundreds.

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Celebrity waxworks get Christmas makeover for charity

Celebrity waxworks at Madame Tussauds have been given a festive makeover in support of Save the Children.

Wax figures of Usain Bolt, Albert Einstein and Kate Winslet in their Christmas jumpers. Credit: PA

Wax figures of Usain Bolt, Albert Einstein, Kate Winslet, Sir Richard Branson and Boris Johnson saw their usual attire replaced with loud Christmas jumpers to show their support for the charity's 'Christmas Jumper Day: Make the world better with a sweater' campaign.

People are being encouraged to wear a Christmas jumper on Friday 13 December and give £1 or more to Save the Children.

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