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Pregnant Kate wraps up as temperatures plummet

he Duchess of Cambridge braved the snow to visit a Scout camp. Credit: PA Wire

Wrapped up against the biting cold, the Duchess of Cambridge arrived wearing a green woollen hat, fleece, green parka-style jacket, dark blue jeans and wellies with a Scout's red, white and blue neckerchief, tied in a friendship knot.

The Duchess of Cambridge cooks around a campfire during a visit to a Scout camp Credit: PA Wire

As snowflakes were blown around the fells above Lake Windermere at the Great Tower activity centre near Newby Bridge, the temperature was estimated to have plummeted to minus five with the wind chill factor.

Kate, five months pregnant, spent about an hour outside with adult scout volunteers and youngsters.

Kate joined fellow adult volunteers as they trained to work with Beaver and Cub Scouts. Credit: PA Wire

Kate declares her pastry twist 'actually not bad'

The Duchess of Cambridge joined 24 other adults on a training day to learn scouting skills to pass on to children at their own groups.

As part of the day Kate learnt how to make "twisters" or "dampers".

She kneaded dough in a bowl for several minutes before making elongated twists. After washing the dough mix off her hands Kate wrapped a twist of the messy mixture around a twig stripped of bark which was placed over the open fire ready to toast.

The Duchess of Cambridge cooks around a campfire during a visit to a Scout camp. Credit: The Scout Association

The volunteers' efforts had mixed results, with the Duchess laughing and giggling with the others as some of the twisters dropped into the flames.

"I'm not sure if these are going to look particularly edible," Kate laughed.

After several minutes toasting on the fire Kate pulled off a piece of the bread and, rather gingerly, popped it in her mouth. "Oh, its actually not bad," she told the group. "It is quite sugary though."

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Kate braves snow to visit Scout camp

The Duchess of Cambridge braved the snow to visit a Scout camp.

The Duchess of Cambridge braved the snow to visit a Scout camp in the Lake District.

Kate, who is a volunteer in the Scout Association, joined fellow adult volunteers as they trained to work with Beaver and Cub Scouts at the Great Tower Scout Camp near Newby Bridge in Cumbria.

Kate joined fellow adult volunteers as they trained to work with Beaver and Cub Scouts.

She will use her training to help look after a group of Cub Scouts from Cumbria and Manchester taking part in a pack holiday event at the 250-acre activity centre close to Windermere.

Kate, who is five months pregnant, will use her training to help look after a group of Cub Scouts.

Guide leaders 'struggle' with religious oath

The Girl Guiding Association says that the online consultation on the future of the organisation's oath of allegiance will allow them to match their members needs better.

The Promise is guiding's beating heart - it is the core expression of values and the common standard that brings everyone in guiding together.

Over the past few years we have heard from more and more girls and leaders who struggle with the wording, particularly in interpreting what it really means to girls today.

Girlguiding UK is committed to retaining a Promise that is in line with its original principles, but we know it is crucial that girls and young women understand and believe in the words they say.

– Girlguiding UK statement

Girl Guides could remove Queen and God from their oath

Brownies model their uniforms in 1990
Brownies could no longer swear to love the Queen as part of the new Promise Credit: GIRLGUIDING UK

The Girl Guides are considering removing references to God and the Queen from their oath of allegiance as the organisation seeks to attract new volunteers.

Thousands of girls are on waiting lists to join the Rainbows, Brownies and Guides because of a lack of trained volunteers to help run events.

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National Secular Society welcomes Scouts atheist consultation

The president of the National Secular Society, Terry Sanderson, said the Scouts' consultation on an alternative oath for atheists was a "move in the right direction".

He also said it would put an end to "unpleasant confrontations" such as that of 11-year-old George Pratt, from Midsomer Norton in Somerset, who was excluded because he did not want to make the Scout Promise in its present form.

By adjusting their promise to include people without a religious belief, the Scouts will bring themselves in line with the reality of 21st-century Britain, where more than two-thirds of young people say they have no religious belief.

If the Scouts decide to change the promise, it would relieve many young people of having to lie about what they believe in order to be part of this great organisation.

– Terry Sanderson, president of the National Secular Society

Membership of the Scouts on the rise

Membership of the Scouts has risen during the past seven years from 444,936 in 2005 to 525,364 this year, figures released by the association show.

Since 2002, the number of girls taking part has increased by 69% while more than 50 scout groups catering for young people drawn mainly from Muslim, Hindu and Sikh communities have opened in the last ten years.

Adventurer and Chief Scout Bear Grylls with young Scouts
Adventurer and Chief Scout Bear Grylls with young Scouts Credit: Martyn Milner/The Scout Association/PA Wire

Existing Scout Promise includes a 'duty to God' pledge

The existing Scout Promise contains a vow of allegiance to the God and the Queen .

It reads:

On my honour, I promise that I will do my best to do my duty to God and to the Queen, to help other people and to keep the Scout Law."

Alternative versions allow Hindus and Buddhists to use the word "my Dharma" while Muslims can use the word "Allah".

Non UK citizens are permitted to replace the phrase "duty to the Queen" with "duty to the country in which I am now living".

Scouts commissioner: 'We have continued to evolve'

We are a values-based movement and exploring faith and religion will remain a key element of the Scouting programme. That will not change.

However, throughout our 105-year history, we have continued to evolve so that we remain relevant to communities across the UK.

We do that by regularly seeking the views of our members and we will use the information gathered by the consultation to help shape the future of scouting for the coming years."

– Wayne Bulpitt, The Scout Association's chief commissioner in the UK
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