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Victim takes part in Pope's anti-abuse group

A woman molested by a priest as a child was named by Pope Francis to be part of a core group to help the Catholic Church fight the clerical sexual abuse of minors.

Marie Collins is a member of a group fighting clerical sexual abuse of minors Credit: Reuters

The first eight members - four women and four men - hail from eight different countries and include Boston Cardinal Sean O'Malley, former Polish Prime Minister Hanna Suchocka and Baroness Sheila Hollins, a British psychiatrist.

The victim is Marie Collins, who was abused in her native Ireland in the 1960s and has campaigned for the protection of children and for justice for victims of clerical paedophilia.

Teacher found guilty of sex abuse dies under a train

A former prep school teacher is thought to have killed himself just two days before he was due to be sentenced for sex crimes.

Retired teacher Hugh Henry in 2011. Credit: Steve Parsons/PA Archive

Hugh Henry, 82, from Amersham, Buckinghamshire, pleaded guilty to 11 counts of indecency with or towards a child, and two counts of gross indecency with a child.

He was expected to be sentenced tomorrow.

Mr Henry is thought to have jumped in front of a train.

"A body, believed to be that of Hugh Henry, was struck by a train close to Amersham London Underground station on Tuesday," Thames Valley Police said.

Henry was due to be sentenced with Roland Peter Wright, 83, from Farnham Royal, Buckinghamshire, who assaulted five pupils aged eight to 13 at Caldicott Boys'Preparatory School between 1959 and 1970.

Deputy Prime Minister Nick Clegg spoke of his shock after Wright was convicted. Mr Clegg was joint head boy at Caldicott in 1980.

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NSPCC hopes abuse findings will ring 'alarm bells'

Claire Lilley, policy adviser at the NSPCC, said she hoped the findings would ring "alarm bells" with authorities that the problem required urgent action.

While more research needs to be done on this problem, we know that technology and easy access to sexual material is warping young people's views of what is 'normal' or acceptable behaviour.

We are treating an increasing number of children who have carried out online grooming, harassment in chatrooms and 'sexting'.

Children who are sexually abusive have often been victims of abuse, harm and trauma themselves. Exposure to this can make them think abusing someone or being sexually violent is ok.

The NSPCC obtained the statistics through Freedom of Information requests to each of the 43 police forces in England and Wales.

But only 34 forces supplied figures - revealing a total of 5,028 offences - so the true number of offences is likely to be higher, the NSPCC said.