Live updates

Spider-Man stars prepare for Singapore's Earth Hour

The Amazing Spider-Man stars Andrew Garfield and Emma Stone have joined in the Earth Hour festivities in Singapore:

Advertisement

British wealth manager sorry after 'poor people' remarks sparked online anger in Singapore

A British wealth manager who lives in Singapore has apologised for referring to public transport commuters as "poor people", which sparked online outrage.

Wealth manager Anton Casey being interviewed in 2010. Credit: YouTube / NTDTV

In another comment posted on Facebook, Anton Casey, a 39-year-old senior wealth manager in the financial sector, said he was washing "the stench of public transport off" him after travelling on the metro.

He also posted a picture of a boy, apparently his son, sitting inside a metro train with the caption saying: "Daddy, where is your car & who are all these poor people?"

Furious online readers flooded social media sites and criticised the Porsche-driving Mr Casey for his controversial comments.

Mr Casey, who is a permanent resident of the country and married to a former Singapore beauty queen, said: "I would like to extend a sincere apology to the people of Singapore. I have the highest respect and regard for Singapore and the good people of Singapore; this is my home.

"I wish for nothing more than to be forgiven for my poor judgement and given a second chance to rebuild the trust people have had in me as a resident of this wonderful country."

Singapore wakes up to another polluting day of haze

Singapore's landmark Marina Bay Sands Hotel has been clouded for yet another day as pollution continues to blight the city. Credit: RTV
Haze from illegal fires in Indonesia have enveloped skyscrapers in the worst pollution to ever hit the city. Credit: RTV
Tourist boats were barely visible in the thick smog, which has been whipped up by heavy winds. Credit: RTV

Firefighters continue to tackle Indonesia forest fires

Firefighters are continuing to tackle forest fires in Indonesia that have led to a thick haze in some cities as well as Singapore and parts of Malaysia.

Firefighters spray water on burning palm oil trees in Dumai, Indonesia Credit: Reuters

Hospitals in Dumai and Bengkalis in Indonesia's Riau province have recorded increases in cases of asthma, lung, eye and skin problems, health official Arifin Zainal told Reuters.

Volunteers prepare new face masks to give to residents.

Free face masks are being distributed and authorities have advised residents to stay indoors with their windows shut.

Some of the fires are believed to have been started illegally by farmers to clear land. Credit: Reuters

Record pollution as smoky haze shrouds Singapore

Air pollution levels in Singapore have soared to a 16-year record high for a third consecutive day, as a smoky haze from forest fires in Indonesia shrouds the city state.

Its main air pollution index hit a measurement of 401 at midday, which is classified as "hazardous" and can aggravate respiratory ailments, the Associated Press reports.

A man wearing a mask walks past the skyline of Singapore's business district Credit: Reuters/Edgar Su

Indonesia's Environment Minister met with Singapore's Environment and Water Resources Minister today to discuss solutions and efforts to mitigate the impact of the fires.

People wearing masks as they cross a street in Singapore's Orchard Road Shopping Area Credit: Reuters

The haze is a recurring problem as a result of forest fires in the dry season, some of which are deliberately started to clear land for cultivation.

A firefighter sprays water into burnt peatland in Palalawan district in Riau province Credit: Reuters/Fikih Nauli

Advertisement

Haze hides Singapore after illegal Sumatra jungle fires

The haze is the result of illegal burning of forests in Indonesia. Credit: RTV

A haze is blanketing Singapore after fires in Indonesia, which could persist for weeks or even longer, according to the Prime Minister.

The Singapore skyline has been obscured by the smoke haze. Credit: APTN

Lee Hsien Loong warned of consequences if Singapore-linked companies were found responsible for the burning.

The illegal burning of forests and other land on Indonesia's Sumatra island, to the west of Singapore, to clear space for palm oil plantations is a chronic problem, particularly during the June to September dry season.

The Singapore skyline has been obscured by the smoke haze. Credit: APTN

At 1 pm local time yesterday, Singapore's pollution standards index (PSI) soared to a new high of 371, indicating air quality was "hazardous".

The Singapore skyline has been obscured by the smoke haze. Credit: APTN