Live updates

Hogan-Howe: Vital action is taken on Lawrence claims

The head of the Metropolitan Police said it is vital police take action on the allegations resulting from the Ellison report into Stephen Lawrence's murder investigation.

The report concluded that a "police spy" had been working within the Lawrence family camp and that one of the officers in the original murder investigation may have acted corruptly.

Sir Bernard Hogan-Howe said: "This sort of allegation shocks me, it shocks my colleagues and it clearly shocked the public so it is vital that we take it seriously and do something about it."

Watch: 'Pretty awful' to read Lawrence report, says Met chief

Met Police chief: 'Pretty awful' to read Lawrence report

Metropolitan Police Commissioner Sir Bernard Hogan-Howe has told ITV News that it was "pretty awful" to hear the findings of the report into Stephen Lawrence's murder investigation.

"As a professional police officer and then to see the reaction of Mr and Mrs Lawrence who were clearly distraught by what it had heard having lost their son so many years ago, at any level, human or professional, it is pretty awful to hear that list of terrible events," he said.

The head of the IPCC has apologised to the Lawrence family for the police watchdog's part in prolonging the "family's search for the truth".

Watch: Neville Lawrence sheds tears during May announcement

Advertisement

Met police chief could face Hillsborough investigation

The Independent Police Complaints Commission (IPCC) said it has asked the family of a Hillsborough victim if they would like it to investigate recent allegations made against the UK's most senior officer, Sir Bernard Hogan-Howe.

The IPCC wrote on Twitter:

L8eip8xcvip6tonddsjp_normal

We've asked a family if they want recent allegations re Sir Bernard Hogan-Howe specifically looked at #Hillsborough http://t.co/rTXUiqEHox

Bzw2kokciaav-em

Met Police 'do not have sufficient information' to begin horsemeat investigation

Metropolitan Police Commissioner Sir Bernard Hogan-Howe has said the police do not yet have sufficient information to start an investigation into allegations of criminal activity relating to horsemeat contamination.

We've talked to the FSA and what we've asked them to do is to give us any evidence that they've got of a crime, and of course we will investigate.

People have got suspicions, I think the minister said there are two broad options, which is either negligence or criminal conspiracy.

They are the options, but of course we can't investigate to see which of the options is true, we just need some information to help us.

Secondly it sounds like there will be a jurisdictional issue. If there is a crime, is it one that has been committed within the UK, or is it one that has been committed abroad?

When we've established those two things, we will know whether or not we take any further action.

There has to be some evidence or intelligence at least on which to base an investigation. At the moment there's clearly suspicion, but not enough yet to start off an investigation.

MPs were today debating food adulteration in a House of Commons debate called by Labour.

Advertisement

Today's top stories