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Computer used to create Web goes on display

A computer used by British scientist Tim Berners-Lee to devise the World Wide Web has gone on display at the Science Museum in London.

To celebrate the web's 25th anniversary, the NeXT cube computer will go on display in the 'Making the Modern World gallery' at the museum.

The NeXT cube computer used by Sir Tim Berners-Lee. Credit: Science Museum

Baroness Martha Lane Fox, who created a charity wanting to make the UK the most digitally skilled nation, attended an event yesterday celebrating the computer going on display in London.

Baroness Martha Lane Fox with the computer. Credit: Science Museum

On March 12 1989, Sir Tim wrote a paper called "Information Management: A Proposal" which aimed for a "universal linked information system" and sent it to his fellow colleagues.

Mike Sendall, Sir Tim's boss, said the paper was "vague but very exciting."

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Web needs 'Magna Carta' to protect its independence

An online "Magna Carta" is needed to protect and enshrine the independence of the world wide web, its inventor has said.

Web Inventor Sir Tim Berners-Lee Credit: PA

Marking 25 years since he invented the medium, Sir Tim Berners-Lee told The Guardian: "We need a global constitution - a bill of rights."

Read: The top five websites Britain can't live without

"Unless we have an open, neutral internet we can rely on without worrying about what's happening at the back door, we can't have open government, good democracy, good healthcare, connected communities and diversity of culture," he said.

"It's not naive to think we can have that, but it is naive to think we can just sit back and get it."

World leaders called to act over web access

The head of the World Wide Web Foundation has called on world leaders to take action to make the internet "affordable, accessible and relevant to all groups in society."

Ten years after world leaders committed to harnessing technology to build an inclusive information society, parents in 48% of countries can't use the web to compare school performance and budgets, women in over 60% of countries can't use the web to help them make informed choices about their bodies, and over half the population in developing countries can't use the web at all.

Countries should accelerate action to make the web affordable, accessible and relevant to all groups in society, as they promised at the World Summit on the Information Society in 2003.

– Anne Jellema, CEO of the World Wide Web Foundation

Read: World Wide Web inventor warns of growing surveillance

Web inventor warns of growing surveillance

The inventor of the World Wide Web has warned that "a growing tide of surveillance and censorship" threatens the future of democracy.

Sir Tim Berners-Lee, who launched the web on Christmas Day 1990, said bold steps are needed to protect fundamental rights to privacy and freedom of opinion online.

Sir Tim Berners-Lee, the inventor of the world wide web Credit: Sean Dempsey/PA Wire

More people use the internet and social media to take action and try to expose wrongdoing, the new Web Index Report, a global league table measuring the web’s growth and impact it has on people.

Sir Tim Berners-Lee slams plans to monitor the web

"Some governments are threatened by this, and a growing tide of surveillance and censorship now threatens the future of democracy," Sir Tim said.

"Bold steps are needed now to protect our fundamental rights to privacy and freedom of opinion and association online."

World Wide Web inventor: 'US spying' 'deeply concerning'

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