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Amazon unveils its first 'Fire' smartphone

Amazon's CEO Jeff Bezos unveils the Fire Phone at a news conference in Seattle Credit: REUTERS/Jason Redmond

Amazon has unveiled its first ever smartphone, which comes equipped with a 3D screen and the ability to recognise millions of songs, films and books.

The web retailer's Fire Phone uses four cameras to track the user's head movements and create the perception of 3D, a packed press conference in Seattle heard.

It will also come with a new app called Firefly, which the company said takes in details from the camera and microphone to recognise and identify objects including books, films, TV shows and music, and then search for them on Amazon.

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Candy Crush maker 'set for $7.6 billion valuation'

Candy Crush has 97 million active daily users worldwide.
Candy Crush has 97 million active daily users worldwide. Credit: Reuters

The makers of the hit smartphone game Candy Crush Saga are set to offer shares on the stock market for the first time on Wednesday, with the company thought to be initially valued at as much as $7.6 billion (£4.6 billion).

Shares in London-based King Digital Entertainment will launch on the New York Stock Exchange, and analysts of the growing digital gaming industry will be looking closely at how they fare.

The company's revenues soared 1,000% between 2012 and 2013. That largely came off the back of the hugely addictive free-to-download game, which has 97 million active daily users worldwide.

Candy Crush is similar to another popular puzzle game, Bejeweled, with gamers having to match candies to reach a set objective.

Features to expect from Nokia's Android 'X' phone

According to reports, Nokia is expected to launch it's first ever Android smartphone, rumoured to be called the X.

Here are its reported features:

  • A handset at the lower end of the smartphone budget
  • An interface that looks more like Windows than Android
  • Microsoft and Nokia services rather than those made by Android-maker Google
  • Nokia's mapping service instead of Google Maps
  • A Nokia store with Android apps, instead of Google Play

Read: Nokia expected to launch the 'X' smartphone

  • A four-inch screen with a 1GHz dual-core Snapdragon processor
  • 512MB of memory
  • 4GB of storage
  • a microSD card slot
  • 5-megapixel camera
  • Six colour options.

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Nokia expected to launch the 'X' smartphone

Nokia is widely expected to launch its first Android smartphone at the Mobile World Congress tomorrow - and has hinted that it's new device will be called the X.

Nokia is widely expected to launch its first Android smartphone at the Mobile World Congress and has hinted that it will be called the X. Credit: Reuters

The manufacturer is expected to reveal the hotly-anticipated device at the world's largest mobile trade show, Barcelona's Mobile World Congress.

On the Finnish company's official blog, it has teased the new smartphone's name with four black arrow signs against a green background forming the letter X.

The handset - which is thought to be at the lower end of smartphone pricing - follows Microsoft buying Nokia's struggling mobile business in September in an effort to "accelerate" its challenge to Apple and Google.

Mobiles putting 'most vulnerable road users in danger'

Mobile phones pose a "similar" threat to road users as drunk drivers would and are leading otherwise responsible drivers into "horrific" accidents, a safety campaigner has said.

Brake deputy chief executive Julie Townsend explained:

We're living in an age when being constantly connected is the norm. More and more of us have smartphones, and find it hard to switch off, even for a minute.

While there are enormous benefits to this new technology, it's also posing dangerous temptations to drivers to divert their concentration away from the critical task at hand, often putting our most vulnerable road users in danger.

Many people who wouldn't dream of drink-driving are succumbing to using their phone and other distractions while driving, oblivious that the effect can be similar and the consequences just as horrific.

– Brake deputy chief executive Julie Townsend
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