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US consider putting North Korea back on terror list

President Barack Obama is considering the possibility of putting North Korea back on the US' terror list following the recent cyber attack on Sony Pictures.

Obama has said one option available to him is to punish North Korea for its act of "cyber-vandalism" by putting the country back on a list of state sponsors of terrorism, from which Pyongyang was removed six years ago.

White House planning international response to Sony hack

The Obama administration is consulting the UK, Australia and New Zealand, among other countries in hopes of organizing an international response to the cyber-attack on Sony Pictures that it has pinned onNorth Korea, a White House official told Reuters.

The US is also consulting South Korea, Japan, China and Russia for help reining in North Korea.

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US: 'North Korea could help us by admitting responsibility'

The United States has dismissed North Korea's offer to help with a joint investigation into hacking of Sony Pictures.

"If the North Korean government wants to help, they can admit their culpability and compensate Sony for the damages this attack caused," National Security Council spokesman Mark Stroh said.

A poster at the premiere of The Interview in Los Angeles. Credit: Reuters

"As the FBI made clear, we are confident the North Korean government is responsible for this destructive attack. We stand by this conclusion."

"The Government of North Korea has a long history of denying responsibility for destructive and provocative actions," he said.

'Grave consequences' if US refuse joint Sony hacking probe

North Korea has warned the US government of 'grave consequences' if they refuse to take part in a joint probe into the recent Sony cyber attack.

A warning was also issued to the US to stop making accusations suggesting North Korea was involved in the attack, Korea's central news agency reports.

ITV News Correspondent Amy Welch reports:

North Korea proposes joint investigation into Sony hack

North Korea have proposed conducting a joint investigation with the US into the cyber attack on Sony's computer systems.

Heavy security surrounds the entrance of United Artists theater during the premiere of the film Credit: REUTERS/Kevork Djansezian

The Korean Central News Agency reports that the nation's government can prove it has nothing to do with the hacking attack.

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George Clooney: Sony must release The Interview

Hollywood actor George Clooney has said the entertainment industry should push for immediate release of The Interview online.

George Clooney: Sony must release The Interview. Credit: PA

Not because everybody has to see the movie, but because I'm not going to be told we can't see the movie.

That's the most important part.

Here, we’re talking about an actual country deciding what content we’re going to have. This affects not just movies, this affects every part of business that we have.

That’s the truth. What happens if a newsroom decides to go with a story, and a country or an individual or corporation decides they don’t like it?

Forget the hacking part of it. You have someone threaten to blow up buildings, and all of a sudden everybody has to bow down.

– George Clooney spoke to Deadline

Clooney told the trade site Deadline that Sony should "do whatever you can to get this movie out".

Obama criticises Sony for 'caving in to censorship'

US President Barack Obama has poured scorn on North Korea as the FBI confirmed the dictatorship had hacked Sony pictures after it produced a satire on an assassination attempt on the life of Kim Jong-un.

Mr Obama said the hacking was 'dangerous folly' which threatened America's commercial interests and worse.

ITV News' Washington Correspondent Robert Moore reports.

Sony 'looking for alternative platform to release The Interview'

Sony Pictures Entertainment said it immediately began looking for alternative platforms to release The Interview after it shelved the planned Christmas Day opening when cinema chains bailed on the comedy film.

Seth Rogen and James Franco in The Interview. Credit: Sony Pictures UK

"It is still our hope that anyone who wants to see this movie will get the opportunity to do so," Sony said in a statement after President Barack Obama criticized the studio for pulling the comedy at the center of a cyber attack blamed on North Korea.

Sony CEO responds to Obama: 'We did not make a mistake'

The head of Sony Pictures has rejected US President Barack Obama's claim the company "made a mistake" by pulling the release of The Interview in the face of terrorist threats.

Michael Lynton said Barack Obama was mistaken in his reading of the film's cancellation. Credit: REUTERS/Toru Hanai

Speaking to CNN, Michael Lynton said Sony did not "give in" to hackers and said Mr Obama, along with the press and public, were "mistaken" over their reading of what prompted them to cancel the film's screenings.

Mr Lynton said Sony "had no alternative" after experiencing "the worst cyber attack in American history".

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