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North and South Korea reach agreement to defuse tensions

North and South Korea have reached an agreement following two days of talks to end hostilities between the two sides.

Under the accord, North Korea expressed regret over a landmine incident that wounded two South Korean soldiers earlier this month. South Korea, in return, agreed to stop anti-North propaganda broadcasts along the border from midday tomorrow.

Follow up talks are planned aimed at improving relations between the two countries. Credit: The South Korean Unification Ministry via AP

In a joint statement, the two sides agreed to hold follow-up talks aimed at improving ties. North Korea has ended the "quasi-state of war" it had declared.

Last week an exchange of artillery fire across the border had pushed the Korean peninsula to the brink of armed conflict.

"It is very meaningful that from this meeting North Korea apologised for the landmine provocation and promised to work to prevent the recurrence of such events and ease tensions." Kim Kwan-jin, South Korea's national security adviser said in a televised statement.

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S. Korea 'will continue broadcasts unless North apologises'

South Korea's anti-North propaganda broadcasts will continue to be blared across the border unless Pyongyang apologises, the country's president has said.

Park Geun-hye said the South deserved an apology after two South Korean soldiers were wounded by landmines along the border.

South Korea had previously dismantled its propaganda loudspeaker in 2004 Credit: Reuters

A statement released by her office reveals Park reportedly told her top aides:

We need a clear apology and measures to prevent a recurrence of these provocations and tense situations.

Otherwise, this government will take appropriate steps and continue loudspeaker broadcasts.

– President Park Geun-hye

It comes amid lengthy inter-Korean talks aimed at easing tensions that have brought the peninsula to the brink of armed conflict.

In 2004, North and South Korea agreed to stop blaring propaganda at one another across the border, but such broadcasts have resumed in recent days as relations between the two countries deteriorate.

North and South Korea officials continue talks

Talks between North and South Korea are continuing Credit: Reuters

Senior aides to the leaders of North and South Korea are continuing talks aimed at easing tensions that have brought the peninsula to the brink of armed conflict.

The meeting at the Panmunjom truce village began on Saturday evening, shortly after North Korea's deadline for loudspeaker propaganda broadcasts along the border to stop or face military action.

The envoys, shown on TV exchanging handshakes at the start of their meeting, are discussing ways to resolve tensions and improve ties, South Korean officials said.

Talks between North and South Korea to continue tomorrow

Talks aimed at ending a standoff between North and South Korea are due to continue tomorrow after being adjourned for the day.

Representatives from North and South Korea met for talks in the border village of Panmunjom in Paju Credit: The South Korean Unification Ministry via AP

The talks, which have seen top aides to the leaders of both countries meet in an attempt to defuse mounting tensions and try to avert possible military action, are being held at the Panmunjom truce village.

According to South Korea's presidential spokesman Min Kyung-wook the meeting adjourned at 4.15am but will resume at 3pm on Sunday. No details about the talks have been disclosed.

North and South Korean officials agree to 'hold contact'

Top aides to the leaders of North and South Korea have agreed to "hold contact" after talks aimed at ending a standoff between the two countries.

Talks were held at Panmunjom truce village. Credit: Reuters

The meeting was held at the Panmunjom truce village after an exchange of artillery fire on Thursday strained relations between the two sides.

North Korea had issued an ultimatum with a deadline demanding that the South halt its loudspeaker propaganda broadcasts along the border or face military action.

That deadline passed without any reported incidents.

"The South and the North agreed to hold contact related to the ongoing situation in South-North relations," Kim Kyou-hyun, South Korea's deputy national security adviser, said in a televised briefing.

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North and South Korean officials to meet amid tensions

Talks to be held between top officials on both sides. Credit: Reuters

Top aides to the leaders of North and South Korea will meet at the Panmunjom truce village close to the military border on Saturday to discuss the situation on the Korean peninsula, the South's presidential office said.

It comes amid high tensions following an exchange of artillery fire on Thursday.

The meeting is due to take place half an hour after North Korea's previously set ultimatum demanding that the South halt its loudspeaker propaganda broadcasts along the border or face military action.

North Korea warns of war after latest border dispute

A 2015 File photo of a South Korean K-2 tank. Credit: Reuters

North Korea has moved its front line troops into "wartime state" after a recent exchange of shellfire with neighbouring South Korea, according to state media in the country.

This potential escalation in regional tensions comes after North Korea opened fire at a series of propaganda loudspeakers operated by its neighbour that were broadcasting propaganda messages across the border.

South Korea retaliated by firing artillery rounds towards North Korea, reportedly provoking Pyongyang to raise military readiness.

Seoul has promised to "powerfully counter-attack any North Korean provocations", the Yonhap news agency report.

North Korea fires shots at South's propaganda loudspeaker

North Korea opened fire at its neighbours to the south today, targeting a loud speaker which has been broadcasting anti-Pyongyang material in recent days, according to local media.

South Korea has previously dismantled its propaganda loudspeaker in 2004 Credit: Reuters

State-run KBS News said the North Korean military opened fire on the western front at around 4pm (8am BST).

The Yonyap news agency in South Korea said there was no apparent damage caused by the shots.

Dozens of rounds of artillery was fired back towards North Korea in retaliation, the agency added, citing military sources - but no immediate response was apparent.

In 2004, North and South Korea agreed to stop blaring propaganda at one another across the border, but such broadcasts have resumed in recent days as relations between the two countries deteriorate.

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