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South Korea prosecutors to appeal ferry crew decision

A South Korean prosecutor said his team would appeal against court rulings on the 15 crew of a capsized ferry who were given prison terms ranging from five to 36 years.

The captain of the ferry, which sank killing about 300 people, mostly children, was acquitted of homicide but was found guilty of negligence by family members of the victims, many of whom were teenage children on a school trip. He was sentenced to 36 years in jail.

Prosecutors had sought the death penalty for the captain for homicide.

36 years in jail for South Korea ferry captain

A South Korean court has found the captain of a ferry that capsized in April guilty of negligence and sentenced him to 36 years in jail.

Sewol ferry captain Lee Joon-seok was sentenced to 36 years in jail. Credit: Reuters

Prosecutors had been seeking the death penalty.

The court also convicted the ship's chief engineer of homicide for not aiding two injured fellow crew members and sentenced him to 30 years in prison.

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South Korea to end search for missing ferry passengers

South Korea has announced it will end underwater searches for the remaining missing people from the ferry that capsized in April.

The announcement came with a South Korean court set to issue verdicts on crew members charged with negligence and abandonment of passengers in the disaster.

The Sewol ferry sank in April - so far 295 bodies have been found. Credit: REUTERS/Kim Kyung-Hoon

So far 295 bodies have been found, but nine people are still missing. Most of the dead were teenage students on a school trip.

Prosecutors have demanded the death penalty for the ship's captain and life sentences for three other crew members.

Billionaire South Korea ferry owner's family guilty of corruption

Three relatives of the owner of a ferry that sank in South Korea have been convicted of corruption, just months after the tycoon was found dead while on the run.

The ship sank off the coast of South Korea. Credit: Reuters

The body of fugitive billionaire Yoo Byung-eun was discovered in rural South Korea in July after a massive manhunt.

The ferry capsized in April, killing more than 300 people.

Yoo's eldest son, Yoo Dae-gyun, was sentenced to three years in prison over embezzlement and breach of trust. Two brothers of Yoo Byung-eun were also convicted of similar corruption charges. One brother got a two-year prison term and the other a suspended prison term. The Yoo family controlled the ferry operator through holding companies.

Victim's body found on sunken South Korea ferry

The first body found in three months is being recovered from South Korea's sunken Sewol ferry, according to the Associated Press.

The Sewol ferry sank in April. Credit: Reuters

The badly decayed corpse was found around a women's toilet on Tuesday, a statement from the government task force said, bringing the official death toll to 295.

DNA tests are planned to identify the body which is the first recovered since July. Nine passengers remain unaccounted for after the boat sank in April.

Most of the ferry victims were teenage students who were on a school trip to a resort island.

Korean prosecutors seek death penalty for ferry captain

South Korean prosecutors are seeking the death penalty for the captain of the ferry that capsized in April, killing over 300 people.

Lee Joon-seok, 68, has been charged with negligent homicide over the incident off the country's south-east coast.

The Sewol ferry sank in April, killing 304 people, including around 250 students. Credit: Reuters

The prosecutors will also seek life sentences for three other crew members who are also charged with homicide.

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South Korea navy fires on North Korean patrol boat

A South Korean naval ship fired warning shots after a North Korean patrol boat crossed a disputed sea border off the peninsula's west coast and fired shots back before retreating, a South Korean defence official said.

There were no casualties on the South Korean side, he told Reuters.

The area has been the scene of clashes in the past that killed scores of sailors on both sides, with North Korean vessels frequently crossing the so-called Northern Limit Line, which it refuses to recognise as a maritime border.

North Korea agrees to new talks on rare trip to South

North Korea's Hwang Pyong-So attends the Asian Games closing ceremony. Credit: REUTERS/Jason Reed

North Korean officials visiting the South in a surprise trip have agreed to a second round of high-level talks.

The agreement came after the country's unofficial second most important leader after Kim Jong-un on a rare trip to South Korea for the close of the Asian Games.

The North Korean delegation was led by Hwang Pyong-So, the top political officer for the Korean People's Army. The rivals held their highest level face-to-face talks in five years.

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