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Nasa: Ammonia leak on ISS possible but not certain

A Nasa statement has said that the crew on board the International Space Station (ISS) is safe and that an ammonia leak is possible but not certain.

The official said the crew had evacuated to one section of the ISS after they observed an increase in water loop pressure and then cabin pressure.

This could indicate an ammonia leak, but this is a "worst case scenario", hence the precautionary evacuation.

The statement said that the alert could also have been caused by a "faulty sensor or by a problem in a computer relay box".

Crew 'evacuated from part of International Space Station'

Astronauts have been evacuated from the US section of the International Space Station due to an ammonia leak, it has been reported.

The evacuation was reportedly ordered due to a leak of "harmful substances" from the cooling system.

All six members of crew, which includes three Russian astronauts, two American and one Italian, are now holed up in the Russian section of the station.

Russian news agencies report the situation is now under control.

Rocket in 'reusable' test mission fails to land on target

A rocket which was part of a mission to test whether space craft could be reused in other launches has failed to hit its mark.

It was hoped the Falcon 9 rocket would land on a special platform floating in the Atlantic.

SpaceX worker Elon Musk tweeted:

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Successful launch for 'reusable' rockets test mission

A test mission for 'reusable' rockets has successfully launched and is headed for the International Space Station.

Watch the countdown to the launch here:

The launch was initially scheduled for Tuesday, but was called off with little more than a minute left of the countdown due to a fault during the second phase of the launch.

The Falcon 9 rocket launched from Cape Canaveral in Florida this morning, carrying the Dragon cargo spacecraft into the sky. It is then due to detatch, and aims to land on a special platform floating in the Atlantic Ocean.

The rocket launched from Cape Canaveral in Florida Credit: @NASA

The aim of the mission is to test whether, if the rocket can return to earth safely after a launch, it could be used again in a subsequent mission.

If so, aerospace firm SpaceX says it could dramatically reduce the cost of space travel.

The craft will deliver cargo to the International Space Station Credit: SpaceX

Watch live: Test mission for 'reusable' space rockets

Aerospace firm SpaceX is launching a cargo ship to the International Space Station as part of a test mission to make rockets reusable.

Watch live here:

The Falcon 9 rocket will launch from Cape Canaveral in Florida at 11.20am UK time, carrying the Dragon cargo spacecraft into the sky before detaching and aiming to land on a special platform floating in the Atlantic Ocean.

The aim of the mission is to test whether, if the rocket can return to earth safely after a launch, it could be used again in a subsequent mission.

If so, SpaceX says it could dramatically reduce the cost of space travel.

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