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Tamsin Outhwaite: We need to make more people aware

Actress Tamsin Outhwaite has backed the Stand By Your Man campaign, saying not enough people are aware of the dangers of prostate cancer.

Despite labelling the statistics "horrific", the actress said that people need to realise it is a very treatable cancer.

Ms Outhwaite's father Colin was diagnosed with prostate cancer in 2009 and was successfully treated.

The actress urged men to recognise the signs and get checked out: "Look at what the symptoms are, get yourself checked out and anyone else that you think might have it - in the same way the guy did for my Dad - tell them, inform them. Keep informing people."

Campaign is real 'opportunity' to get men talking

The CEO of Prostate Cancer UK has said the Stand By Your Man campaign is a "real opportunity" to get men and their loved ones talking about prostate cancer.

Owen Sharp, who praised the "incredible" cast list involved in the Fathers Day film, said:

"We know we are starting to raise awareness but we know we have so much further to go.

"The whole idea behind it is to get conversations going around every kitchen table, round every journey in every car or any other time people are talking about things."

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Film aimed at those 'not being reached' by campaigns

Martin Sadofski, who wrote the film Fathers Day, said it was important to reach an audience who were not usually reached by campaigns in order to raise awareness of prostate cancer.

The screenwriter, who was delighted with the A-list cast who starred in the film, said:

"The nice thing about it was to go for an audience that wouldn't normally read about prostate cancer so we wanted to go for the kind of guys that like football, watch blockbuster action films the guy on the building site, the taxi driver.

"It was important for us to reach an audience that weren't being reached."

Men are 'unaware' of the dangers of prostate cancer

Former footballer Mark Bright has warned that men are unaware of the dangers of prostate cancer.

Mr Bright said the recent campaign was trying to spread awareness and urged men around the age of 50 to go and get checked.

The former Crystal Palace player cited football as a way of spreading awareness:

"I just feel that football, which is predominantly a male crowd, and that's a great sort of area to target and to get the word out there."

'You don't need to suffer' from prostate cancer

Actor Cyril Nri has called on men are worried that they might be suffering from prostate cancer to go and get tested.

Recalling his own family's experiences and those in the wider Afro-Carribean community, the actor urged men to go and get checked out because "you don't need to suffer from it".

"Men very rarely talk about illness. I don't like visiting the doctor. Most of my friend's don't like visiting the doctor. We just stay away and think ' Oh it will go away'

"If you have any inkling that you are suffering from this go and get it checked."

'Fundamentally important' men go and get tested

Actor Neil Stuke has said it is fundamentally important that men from all backgrounds get tested for prostate cancer.

Mr Stuke said: "The most fundamentally important thing that it (the campaign) should do is for men to go and get tested.

"If you are diagnosed with prostate cancer, there is hope and lots of hope."

The actor, who played a character in BBC show Silk who was diagnosed with the illness, is an ambassador of Prostate Cancer UK.

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