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'At least two dead' in shooting at bar in Sweden

At least two people have died and several were injured after a gunman opened fire inside a bar in the city of Gothenburg, Swedish police said.

Police said that an automatic weapon is believed to have been used in the shooting, but they had no details on any suspects.

The shooting happened in Gothenburg, Sweden's second largest city. Credit: Google Maps

The shooting happened in the Biskopsgarden suburb in a neighborhood that has a history of gang violence, police spokeswoman Ulla Brehm said.

"There is absolutely nothing that indicates terrorism," Brehm said, adding there where indications that it was gang related.

Swedish prosecutors bid to question Assange

Prosecutors from Sweden have submitted a formal request to WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange, asking his permission to question him in London where he has claimed asylum in the Ecuadorian embassy.

The prosecutor wants to quiz him and carry out DNA tests in connection with allegations of sexual assault and rape, which Assange denies.

Julian Assange has been living in the Ecuadorian embassy for almost three years Credit: Reuters

The Australian has been hiding inside the South American country's UK embassy for almost three years, in fear of being extradited to Sweden.

He says he believes if he was sent to Sweden, he would then be extradited to the United States where he faces being tried for one of the biggest information leaks in the country's history through his website.

Assange's Swedish lawyer has reportedly welcomed the request to question him, but said he is concerned that the process could take some time, as both Britain and Ecuador will have to give their permission for the interview to take place.

Assange has previously offered to be interviewed inside the embassy, but Swedish authorities had refused until now.

We welcome and see it also as a big victory ... for Julian Assange, that what we have demanded is finally going to happen.

– Per Samuelson, lawyer

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Sweden ends search for 'suspected foreign submarine'

Swedish marines seen earlier this week near Stockholm in a search for possible underwater activity. Credit: TT News Agency/PA

The Swedish military says it has called of its search for a suspected foreign submarine in waters off Stockholm after a week-long hunt.

"This means the bulk of ships and amphibious forces have returned to port," the armed forces said in a statement, adding that some smaller forces would remain in the area.

In what was the country's biggest military mobilisation since the Cold War, more than 200 troops, stealth ships and helicopters scoured waters after reports of foreign "underwater activity" - suspected to be a Russian sub.

Sweden steps up hunt for 'foreign underwater activity'

Crew members onboard a Swedish Navy fast-attack craft stand guard at the Stockholm archipelago. Credit: Reuters

Sweden has boosted its military presence in the Stockholm archipelago to search for "foreign underwater activity" in the county's largest mobilisation of troops and ships since the end of the Cold War.

The search in the Baltic Sea less than 31 miles (50 km) from Stockholm began on Friday and this operation comes amid increasing tension with Russia among the Nordic and Baltic states over the Ukraine crisis.

Finland last week accused the Russian navy of interfering with a Finnish environmental research vessel in international waters.

Swedish military spokesmen said the information about suspicious activity came from a trustworthy source and that more than 200 military personnel were involved in the search.

Swedish daily Svenska Dagbladet, citing unidentified sources with knowledge of the search, said the military operation began after a radio transmission in Russian on an emergency frequency was intercepted.

Sweden officially recognises state of Palestine

Sweden is to recognise the state of Palestine in a move that will make it the first major member of the European Union to do so.

r Stefan Lofven (front 2nd L) said Sweden will recognise the state of Palestine. Credit: Reuters

The prime minister of the new centre-left government Stefan Lofven said the conflict between Israel and Palestine can only be solved with a "two-state solution".

"Sweden will therefore recognise the state of Palestine," Lofven said during his inaugural address in parliament.

Hungary, Poland and Slovakia recognised Palestine before they joined the EU, making Sweden the first country to acknowledge Palestine while being a member of the bloc.

More than 2,000 people were killed after a seven-week conflict between Israel and Hamas earlier this year.

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