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Unqualified teachers 'damaging school standards'

Schools hiring unqualified teaching staff is "damaging standards", shadow education secretary Tristam Hunt said, after a poll claimed that around more than half said that unqualified staff working as teachers were planning and preparing lessons.

Shadow education secretary Tristram Hunt Credit: PA

Tristram Hunt said: "Many parents will be shocked to learn that David Cameron has changed the rules to allow schools to appoint unqualified teachers on a permanent basis.

"Improving the education our children receive in our schools means continually improving the quality of teaching in the classroom. Labour would end David Cameron's policy and ensure a qualified teacher in every classroom."

DfE: Quality of teaching workforce 'is rising'

It is right that state schools should enjoy the same advantage that private schools, a Department for Education spokeswoman has said, after a survey found that schools were using unqualified staff to teach pupils.

[The] latest teacher workforce census show there are 700 fewer non-QTS teachers in schools than there were in 2010, while the percentage of non-QTS teachers in academies is down from 9.4% in 2010 to 5.3%.

Overall the quality of the teaching workforce is rising. A record 96% of all teachers now have degrees or above, meaning there are an extra 43,000 teachers with degree level qualifications in classrooms since 2010

– Spokeswoman, Department for Education

Read: NASUWT: Uncertainty over qualified teachers

Read: Schools 'using unqualified staff to teach students'

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NASUWT: Uncertainty over qualified teachers

Many teachers believe that the use of unqualified staff is worsening because schools cannot, or will not, pay for qualified individuals, according to a new survey of teachers. The general secretary of NASUWT, who conducted the poll, said:

Parents no longer have the certainty of knowing that when they send their children to school they will be taught by a qualified teacher.

Our children and young people have been robbed of a fundamental entitlement to be taught by qualified teachers.

– Chris Keates, NASUWT general secretary

Read: Schools 'using unqualified staff to teach students'

Schools 'using unqualified staff to teach students'

Schools are using unqualified staff to teach pupils and prepare lessons, according to a survey of teachers. It also suggests that many teachers believe that the use of unqualified staff is worsening because schools cannot, or will not, pay for qualified individuals.

The poll, conducted by the NASUWT union, asked around 7,000 members for their views on schools using staff that do not hold Qualified Teacher Status (QTS).

Schools 'using unqualified staff' Credit: Max Nash/PA Wire.

It found that just over half of those questioned (53%) reported that there were unqualified staff working as teachers in their school.

The results also show that nearly two thirds (65%) of teachers say that the use of unqualified staff is "getting worse because schools can't or won't pay for qualified teachers."

Strike action 'will damage reputation of teaching'

Strike action will damage the reputation of teaching, a Department for Education spokeswoman has said, as the National Union of Teachers are today expected to back fresh walkouts in the summer if progress is not made in resolving a bitter dispute over pay, pensions and conditions.

Ministers have met frequently with the NUT and other unions and will continue to do so. Further strike action will only disrupt parents' lives, hold back children's education and damage the reputation of the profession.

We know that the vast majority of our teachers and school leaders are hard-working and dedicated professionals. That is why we are giving teachers more freedoms than ever and cutting unnecessary paperwork and bureaucracy.

– Spokeswoman, Department for Education

NUT defend timing of potential teachers' strike

An advanced GCSE maths extension paper set by one exam board is scheduled to take place on Wednesday June 25, during a potential teachers' strike.

Exam timetables show that at least a dozen GCSE and A-level papers are due to be sat by students on the first two days of the week proposed in the National Union of Teacher's resolution. NUT general secretary Christine Blower said:

This week has been deliberately chosen because we believe that there will be no exams beyond those dates.

Strike action will not disrupt exams. If necessary, exemptions can be given got staff who are needed to supervise an exam, but the NUT is looking to take action at the end of the main exam season.

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Teachers to debate strike action over pay

Teachers are today expected to back fresh walkouts in the summer if progress is not made in resolving a bitter dispute over pay, pensions and conditions.

Teachers to debate over strike action Credit: PA

Delegates at the National Union of Teachers (NUT) annual conference in Brighton are due to debate a priority motion seeking co-ordinated national strike action in the week beginning Monday June 23.

The move comes just weeks after the NUT staged a national walkout, and raises the prospect of widespread disruption to thousands of schools in England and Wales in the summer term.

Read: A day of teacher strikes closes thousands of schools

Teachers could be set for fresh round of strikes

Teachers are preparing for a fresh round of strikes at the end of June in a long and bitter row with the Government over pay, pensions and conditions.

The fresh round of strikes could hit schools in England and Wales in the summer term. Credit: Barry Batchelor/PA Wire

Members of the National Union of Teachers (NUT) could walkout this summer if the dispute is not resolved.

The union will debate whether to stage fresh walkouts at their annual conference, being held in Brighton, which seeks co-ordinated national strikes in the week beginning Monday June 23 if "significant progress" is not made in ongoing talks with the Government.

The move comes just weeks after the NUT staged a national walkout and offers the prospect of widespread disruption to schools in England and Wales in the summer term.

Union: Teachers face 'unrelenting stress'

Teachers suffer from "unrelenting" stress which begins from when they start their working day until they go to bed, according to the head of a teacher's union.

Mary Bousted, the General Secretary of the Association of Teachers and Lecturers warned Daybreak teachers were already working 60 hours a weak and faced "the most unpaid overtime of any profession".

Govt: Teaching has 'never been more attractive'

The Government defended the workload it was leaving teachers with, saying statistics showed the profession had "never been more attractive".

Despite evidence showing a sharp rise in the number of teachers struggling with mental health issues, a Department of Education spokeswoman said:

We know that the vast majority of teachers and school leaders are hard-working and dedicated professionals, and statistics show that teaching has never been more attractive, more popular or more rewarding.

A record number of top graduates are now applying to become teachers and vacancy rates are at their lowest since 2005.

We are giving teachers more freedoms than ever and cutting unnecessary paperwork and bureaucracy.

We trust the professionalism of our headteachers to work with their staff to ensure they receive the support they need and to see that any issues are addressed.

– Department for Education Spokeswoman
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