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Strike action 'will damage reputation of teaching'

Strike action will damage the reputation of teaching, a Department for Education spokeswoman has said, as the National Union of Teachers are today expected to back fresh walkouts in the summer if progress is not made in resolving a bitter dispute over pay, pensions and conditions.

Ministers have met frequently with the NUT and other unions and will continue to do so. Further strike action will only disrupt parents' lives, hold back children's education and damage the reputation of the profession.

We know that the vast majority of our teachers and school leaders are hard-working and dedicated professionals. That is why we are giving teachers more freedoms than ever and cutting unnecessary paperwork and bureaucracy.

– Spokeswoman, Department for Education

NUT defend timing of potential teachers' strike

An advanced GCSE maths extension paper set by one exam board is scheduled to take place on Wednesday June 25, during a potential teachers' strike.

Exam timetables show that at least a dozen GCSE and A-level papers are due to be sat by students on the first two days of the week proposed in the National Union of Teacher's resolution. NUT general secretary Christine Blower said:

This week has been deliberately chosen because we believe that there will be no exams beyond those dates.

Strike action will not disrupt exams. If necessary, exemptions can be given got staff who are needed to supervise an exam, but the NUT is looking to take action at the end of the main exam season.

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Teachers to debate strike action over pay

Teachers are today expected to back fresh walkouts in the summer if progress is not made in resolving a bitter dispute over pay, pensions and conditions.

Teachers to debate over strike action Credit: PA

Delegates at the National Union of Teachers (NUT) annual conference in Brighton are due to debate a priority motion seeking co-ordinated national strike action in the week beginning Monday June 23.

The move comes just weeks after the NUT staged a national walkout, and raises the prospect of widespread disruption to thousands of schools in England and Wales in the summer term.

Teachers could be set for fresh round of strikes

Teachers are preparing for a fresh round of strikes at the end of June in a long and bitter row with the Government over pay, pensions and conditions.

The fresh round of strikes could hit schools in England and Wales in the summer term. Credit: Barry Batchelor/PA Wire

Members of the National Union of Teachers (NUT) could walkout this summer if the dispute is not resolved.

The union will debate whether to stage fresh walkouts at their annual conference, being held in Brighton, which seeks co-ordinated national strikes in the week beginning Monday June 23 if "significant progress" is not made in ongoing talks with the Government.

The move comes just weeks after the NUT staged a national walkout and offers the prospect of widespread disruption to schools in England and Wales in the summer term.

Union: Teachers face 'unrelenting stress'

Teachers suffer from "unrelenting" stress which begins from when they start their working day until they go to bed, according to the head of a teacher's union.

Mary Bousted, the General Secretary of the Association of Teachers and Lecturers warned Daybreak teachers were already working 60 hours a weak and faced "the most unpaid overtime of any profession".

Govt: Teaching has 'never been more attractive'

The Government defended the workload it was leaving teachers with, saying statistics showed the profession had "never been more attractive".

Despite evidence showing a sharp rise in the number of teachers struggling with mental health issues, a Department of Education spokeswoman said:

We know that the vast majority of teachers and school leaders are hard-working and dedicated professionals, and statistics show that teaching has never been more attractive, more popular or more rewarding.

A record number of top graduates are now applying to become teachers and vacancy rates are at their lowest since 2005.

We are giving teachers more freedoms than ever and cutting unnecessary paperwork and bureaucracy.

We trust the professionalism of our headteachers to work with their staff to ensure they receive the support they need and to see that any issues are addressed.

– Department for Education Spokeswoman

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Poll: Work leaves '70% of teachers exhausted'

Almost three-quarters of teachers admitted feeling exhausted long after the school bell had rung for the day, a survey has shown.

A poll from the Association of Teachers and Lecturers found:

  • Some 70% said they are left feeling exhausted by their work.
  • Two thirds, (66%) said it disturbs their sleep.
  • A massive 80% said working as a teacher left them feeling stressed.
  • ATL warned a stigma attached to mental health issues means many people are afraid to tell their employers they are suffering - 68% of those dealing with a mental health problem chose to keep it a secret from bosses.
  • Only 38% of those who kept a physical health issue to themselves.

Mental health problems in teachers rise by 'over a third'

The number of teachers suffering from mental health problems due to the pressures of their profession has risen by over a third, a survey has revealed.

More and more teachers are suffering under their increased workload, the ATL found. Picture posed by model. Credit: PA

Some 38% of teachers told the Association of Teachers and Lecturers (ATL) there had been a rise in mental health problems among their colleagues over the last two years.

And over half (55%) of the 925 education staff quizzed said their job has had a negative effect on their mental health.

ATL general secretary Dr Mary Bousted said she was shocked at the results, but felt the data spoke for itself.

"Teachers, lecturers, support staff and heads are now so over-worked that it comes as no surprise that so many in the education profession suffer from stress, depression and other mental health issues," she said.

Schools minister: 'Teacher strike action 'unreasonable'

After thousands of teachers walked out on strike today - over pay, pensions and conditions - the schools minister David Laws says he is "disappointed" the action was taken.

Mr Laws described the strikes as "unreasonable" as "constructive" talks are continuing between Department for Education and unions.

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