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Girl, 8, killed in anti-government protest rally in Thailand

At least one person - an eight-year-old girl - has been shot dead and dozens more have been injured at an anti-government protest in Thailand, officials said today.

A man who was injured in an attack during an anti-government protest is wheeled by rescue workers. Credit: Reuters

Gunmen in a pickup truck attacked the rally in the east of the country, yesterday evening in Trat province, about 180 miles east of Bangkok.

About 500 protesters were demanding the resignation of Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra.

Thai media reported that as many as three people were killed and several others are in critical condition, but National Security Council chief Lt. Gen. Paradorn Pattanathuabutr has so far confirmed only the child's death.

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Four killed as Thai protesters clash with police

Police said they came under fire from a sniper.
Police said they came under fire from a sniper. Credit: Reuters

Four people have been killed and dozens injured in Bangkok, as anti-government protests turned deadly violent.

Thai police tried to clear protesters from the streets and charged at various camps, in some of the fiercest clashes seen in the four months of protests.

One policeman was killed by gunshot and several were wounded by a grenade.
One policeman was killed by gunshot and several were wounded by a grenade. Credit: Reuters

Thailand's anti-corruption body announced it was filing charges against Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra relating to a rice subsidy scheme that has fuelled middle-class opposition to her government.

The unpopularlity of Thai premiere Yingluck Shinawatra continues to grow inside Bangkok. Credit: Reuters

The protests are the latest installment of an eight-year political battle broadly pitting the Bangkok middle class and royalist establishment against the poorer, mostly rural supporters of Yingluck and her billionaire brother, former premier Thaksin Shinawatra.

More: Polls close in largely peaceful elections in Thailand

Polls close in largely peaceful elections in Thailand

Voting has ended in Thailand's general election but it is likely to be weeks before there is a result.

Protesters demanding the right to vote at a district office where voting was called off in Bangkok
Protesters demanding the right to vote at a district office where voting was called off in Bangkok Credit: REUTERS/Damir Sagolj

Apart from a few scuffles voting was relatively peaceful, a day after seven people were wounded by gunshots and explosions during clashes in north Bangkok.

There were reports of disruption to voting at almost half of Bangkok's polling stations and 37 out of 56 constituencies in the south, where opposition to the government is also strong.

Polling elsewhere in the country was unaffected.

Thailand ballot protests mean more voting lies ahead

Further voting in Thailand's election is already scheduled for February 23 after problems with advance voting last Sunday, while the ballot in some southern areas may not happen for weeks. Voting ends at 8am GMT, but no results will be announced today.

Protesters demanding the right to vote break into the district office in Bangkok. Credit: Reuters/Damir Sagolj

National Security Council chief Paradorn Pattanatabutr said: "The situation overall is calm and we haven't received any reports of violence this morning. "The protesters are rallying peacefully to show their opposition to this election."

Voting in 13 of Bangkok's 33 constituencies was disrupted. Thirty-seven out of 56 constituencies in the south, where opposition to the government is also strong, suffered disruption. Polling elsewhere in the country was unaffected.

Read: Thailand goes to the polls under heavy security

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Thailand begins voting amid threats of disruption

Thailand has started voting on in an election called by Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra in December in an attempt to defuse protests aimed at overthrowing her.

Thais have begun voting. Credit: Reuters

However, the protesters are still out on the streets and say they may disrupt voting. The main opposition Democrat Party is boycotting the election.

Thailand goes to the polls under heavy security

Voters in Thailand go to the polls from 1am GMT under heavy security in an election that could push the divided country deeper into political turmoil and leave the winner paralysed for months by street protests, legal challenges and legislative limbo.

A pro-government activist injured during clashes in Bangkok. Credit: Reuters/ Nir Elias

The risk of bloodshed at the ballot remains high, a day after seven people were wounded by gunshots and explosions during a standoff between supporters and opponents of embattled Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra in a north Bangkok stronghold of her Puea Thai Party.

The usual campaign billboards, glossy posters and pre-election buzz have been notably absent this time, as will be millions of voters fearful of poll violence or bent on rejecting a ballot bound to re-elect the political juggernaut controlled by Yingluck's billionaire brother, Thaksin Shinawatra.

Read: Thai 'opposition' supporter's car attacked in Bangkok

Gunshots and explosions rock Bangkok on eve of polls

Dozens of gunshots and at least two explosions shook Thailand's capital on Saturday, a day before a general election.

A pro-government activist injured during clashes in Bangkok Credit: REUTERS/ Nir Elias

Six people were wounded in front of a suburban shopping mall in the north of Bangkok.

Anti-government protesters scan the area during a gunfight Credit: REUTERS/Damir Sagolj

The election is seen as incapable of restoring stability in the deeply polarised country. Protesters took to the streets for the latest round of an eight-year conflict between the government's supporters and its opponents.

An anti-government protester during a gunfight Credit: REUTERS/ Nir Elias

Some of anti-government protesters want to block balloting in the Sunday election, which is predicted to return Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra to power.

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